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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2

    Best Database and language for freelancing

    OK, years ago I used to work as a programmer using vb 6 and access for a company.

    I haven't programmed in a few years but I am going to start freelancing, working on database software for small and medium size companies.

    Whats the best database and language to use today.

    Main Factors:

    • Cost
    • Speed(Some of these companies don't necessarily have the latest and greatest computers)
    • The ability to embed the database in the final executable. I use to be able to do this with access and vb6



    Thanks in advance for all the information

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    out on a limb
    Posts
    13,692
    depedns on what the application is, how large it is and so one
    how many users

    of course you could design your code so its modular, use OOP techniques and subclass the actual deb interface to a specific class. that would allow you to target any user and any database storage method.

    theres two main types of storage mechanism server and file based systems
    the file based systems such as JET (more commonly known as Access), Filemaker and the new boy on the block SQLLite are fine for small numbers of concurrent users. SQLLite has the potential advantage that fewer desktops will have the tools to directly read data, where as vast numbers will ave that capability in Access.
    the server based systems require more maintenance, higher degree of skill and familiarity but are more flexible, but that comes at a price.

    as to best language for freelancing, although there will continue to be a market for VB6 I think its dead or dying, within the Microsoft house there's VB.NET & C#.NET (well if truth be told any of the .NET languages. if you are havign to retrain then you may want to consider JAVA (and that could bring the embedded DERBY db into play).

    OR you may care to choose to go down the 'cloud computing' idea which may ential more knowedge of HTML, CSS & AJAX and so on
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by healdem View Post
    depedns on what the application is, how large it is and so one
    how many users

    of course you could design your code so its modular, use OOP techniques and subclass the actual deb interface to a specific class. that would allow you to target any user and any database storage method.

    theres two main types of storage mechanism server and file based systems
    the file based systems such as JET (more commonly known as Access), Filemaker and the new boy on the block SQLLite are fine for small numbers of concurrent users. SQLLite has the potential advantage that fewer desktops will have the tools to directly read data, where as vast numbers will ave that capability in Access.
    the server based systems require more maintenance, higher degree of skill and familiarity but are more flexible, but that comes at a price.

    as to best language for freelancing, although there will continue to be a market for VB6 I think its dead or dying, within the Microsoft house there's VB.NET & C#.NET (well if truth be told any of the .NET languages. if you are havign to retrain then you may want to consider JAVA (and that could bring the embedded DERBY db into play).

    OR you may care to choose to go down the 'cloud computing' idea which may ential more knowedge of HTML, CSS & AJAX and so on
    You have piqued my interest in the cloud computing area

    Questions:

    Are there other IDE's for the .net languages that I can use for free. The visual studio IDE is quite expensive.

    Also can Mysql and postgresql be easily embedded i.e. packaged with the application executable.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    14
    There's a free Visual Studio edition called Express: Free Developer Tools - Visual Studio 2010 Express | Microsoft Visual Studio

    I don't think many "server" type DBMSs can be embedded or vice-versa. You'd probably want to choose your database server specifically for each individual client or project. There are some variants between the SQL used by different DBMSs, but they're fairly minor. Don't worry about your skills not translating well between them.

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