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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    1

    Unanswered: From Data Analyst to DBA

    Hello to all, I recently was offered a position as a junior data analyst who will be working side by side with DBA's, data analysts, etc. I wanted to know how common is it for a data analyst to eventually become a DBA. I just graduated college with a BS in CIS and may main area of interest is in databases. I worked three years as a some what junior DBA/Database Analyst but it was an Access system and did some occational backups, restores, migrations, etc. I just recently started learning T-SQL and believe to have an intermediate level of knowledge, but everyday I am getting better at it. Set up a home lab hacking away at MSSQL daily. So that's all there is about me. I just want to know how likely is it for a data analyst to become a DBA one day.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Unfortunately you are on a slippery slope to becoming a DBA. There isn't much of any way to avoid becoming one now.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Ohio
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    I hereby promote you to Junior DBA.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  4. #4
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    I did not know there was a career path. I thought we were just born this way like Lady Gaga. Good DBAs usually become DBAs because of their uncanny problem solving ability. I offcially have not been a DBA for a few years now, but what do I find myself doing this morning? Going back and forth with the head DBA chasing production SPIDS and talking about blocking chains and deadlocks. So I am still a DBA of sorts. Albeit one that resides in development, does little actual development and serves more as 3rd tier tech support to the users and the developers and the DBAs and everyone keeps mistakenly thinking I am management.

    Ultimately, all of these jobs (developers, DBAs, support techs etc...) involve one central skill. Problem solving. Be good at that and you can call yourself anything you want. You can call me anything you want except late for dinner.
    “If one brings so much courage to this world the world has to kill them or break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” Earnest Hemingway, A Farewell To Arms.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    20,002
    the difference between a data analyst and a database administrator is like the difference between a tour guide and an auto mechanic

    the tour guide knows when to use a car and when not to, while the auto mechanic can fix and tune any engine but is pretty useless if the problem doesn't actually involve a car engine

    granted, database administration salaries are stratospheric, because you need ~humoungously~ detailed knowledge and skills, whereas competent data analysts simply need to be able to talk to business users, a skill which, in my opinion, is undervalued

    if you go into database administration, it'll be really hard to get out of it (not to mention the joys of living with a beeper that always chooses 3:15 a.m. to go off)

    not only that, but you can easily get compartmentalized (a competent oracle dba is going to be passed over for a sql server dba position that requires years of experience with sql server)

    if you improve your data analysis skills, however, you can work with any database software, and the opportunities for other lucrative career paths (e.g. management) will just keep on growing
    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
    Buy my SitePoint book: Simply SQL

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thrasymachus View Post
    I did not know there was a career path. I thought we were just born this way like Lady Gaga.
    I suppose that would explain my expanding collection of semi-formal meat-wear.


    Pat nailed it. The blessing of curiosity and problem solving skills will eventually evolve into a curse called "competency". As Pat can explain, it all goes downhill from there.
    oh yeah... documentation... I have heard of that.

    *** What Do You Want In The MS Access Forum? ***

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Ain't life a 'bish. Born with a few extra brain cells and you get sentenced to life in a cage as corporate america's problem solving dancing monkey.
    “If one brings so much courage to this world the world has to kill them or break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” Earnest Hemingway, A Farewell To Arms.

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