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  1. #1
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    Unanswered: how to limit a search in one database

    anyone here know, how to limit a search in one database?

  2. #2
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    Mar 2007
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    Holmestrand, Norway
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    Can you please be more precise? A user must be created for each database, so a user has by nature only access to one database. To limit the search possibilities in a specific database you may use various techniques, as for instance having tables organized in schemas, assigning permissions directly on tables, or even expose the needed data in views, and grant permission on the views only.
    Ole Kristian Velstadbråten Bangås - Virinco - MSSQL.no - Facebook - Twitter

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by roac View Post
    Can you please be more precise? A user must be created for each database, so a user has by nature only access to one database. To limit the search possibilities in a specific database you may use various techniques, as for instance having tables organized in schemas, assigning permissions directly on tables, or even expose the needed data in views, and grant permission on the views only.
    i'm just wondering how many gigabytes of data in a database can sql server hold? and the question how to limit a search in one database, come out when my friend want to sell search engine application by limiting the search in database, For example user only can search 5000 photo in one database,does it make sense?

  4. #4
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    With a proper data model and indexing, a SQL Server database can hold several TB of data. For a user to only see 5000 photos as you phrase, wou'll need some kind of a filter, eg the userid or username for the user to see his or her own photos.
    Ole Kristian Velstadbråten Bangås - Virinco - MSSQL.no - Facebook - Twitter

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by roac View Post
    With a proper data model and indexing, a SQL Server database can hold several TB of data. For a user to only see 5000 photos as you phrase, wou'll need some kind of a filter, eg the userid or username for the user to see his or her own photos.
    another question if you don't mind maybe you can give me some advice on preparing the hardware requirement for sql database server, in terms of processor, RAM and hard disk. The database will store a lot of images,audio and video, basically its need a better performance and more space. what i'm trying to propose them is a hex core processor, 64GB RAM and 4TB to up HD, since this is my first time to come out with these proposal, i'm worried if my requirements not support the performance or reliability.

  6. #6
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    It's impossible to give recommendation without knowing the load of a server. As a general comment, I rarely see any SQL Server where the processing power is a limitation. Most of the time it comes down to disk I/O and memory. Disk I/O is generally obtained by more drives, faster rotational speed, or solid state. Having 64GB of memory instead of lets say 8GB may give a huge performance gain (if a lot of data can be cached), or almost no gain at all if you have very random data access.

    To summarize: You have to know your data access and load before you can say anything about needed hardware.
    Ole Kristian Velstadbråten Bangås - Virinco - MSSQL.no - Facebook - Twitter

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by roac View Post
    It's impossible to give recommendation without knowing the load of a server. As a general comment, I rarely see any SQL Server where the processing power is a limitation. Most of the time it comes down to disk I/O and memory. Disk I/O is generally obtained by more drives, faster rotational speed, or solid state. Having 64GB of memory instead of lets say 8GB may give a huge performance gain (if a lot of data can be cached), or almost no gain at all if you have very random data access.

    To summarize: You have to know your data access and load before you can say anything about needed hardware.
    thanks for the advice roac

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