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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Unanswered: linux applic. server setup with SQL Server

    Hi,

    for a new project the application server will be on a Linux server that connects with SQL Server 2008 R2.

    How do I best setup SQL Server to work in this environment? The development will be done on Linux PC's, so the accounts of the developers are not known in AD. I need to grant access to the developers and the application server.
    With kind regards . . . . . SQL Server 2000/2005/2012
    Wim

    Grabel's Law: 2 is not equal to 3 -- not even for very large values of 2.
    Pat Phelan's Law: 2 very definitely CAN equal 3 -- in at least two programming languages

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    Provided Answers: 11
    Well, SQL Server authentication is the usual route. Create logins for the developers on the development server with dbo rights on their database, and an application login for the application to use (with restricted rights).

    If you want to investigate the possibility, you could also have these accounts authenticate with certificates. I have never done that before, but BoL has all the information you may need.

    Lastly, I believe that Linux can use AD as a source for single sign on authentication. It may just need to be added to the Linux PC configuration as an LDAP server. Again, I have no personal experience with that, so you may have to ask at a Linux forum to see if Linux can provide the same functionality as the RunAs utility in Windows.

    Make sure they use stored procedures. Java likes to pass all parameters as nvarchar.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Provided Answers: 4
    Thank you for your response.

    It will be a Ruby on Rails application, not Java.

    I have been reading in BOL about application roles
    Because application roles are a database-level principal, they can access other databases only through permissions granted in those databases to guest. Therefore, any database in which guest has been disabled will be inaccessible to application roles in other databases.
    In the transition period, the new application must be able to access the legacy (2000, 2005) databases too, for data that is not yet migrated to the new database. It seems I won't be able to use an application role, unless I open all our current databases to Guest.
    With kind regards . . . . . SQL Server 2000/2005/2012
    Wim

    Grabel's Law: 2 is not equal to 3 -- not even for very large values of 2.
    Pat Phelan's Law: 2 very definitely CAN equal 3 -- in at least two programming languages

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    Provided Answers: 11
    Application roles are actually a different thing. They are used to sequester permissions in a database from the usual users. The activation of an application role is intended to be embedded in some compiled application hidden from the user, so that user will not go after the database with Excel or Access. To authenticate to the server, you will need a SQL Authenticated user.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,427
    Provided Answers: 4
    You're right. I got those two mixed up.
    With kind regards . . . . . SQL Server 2000/2005/2012
    Wim

    Grabel's Law: 2 is not equal to 3 -- not even for very large values of 2.
    Pat Phelan's Law: 2 very definitely CAN equal 3 -- in at least two programming languages

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