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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Alpine Califormia
    Posts
    1,789

    Unanswered: Rootkits on the server

    Hi all I have a question, our SQL Server has been going pretty slow lately and sometimes it freezes. I am wondering if there is a rootkit on there that I havent detected yet? I have Malewarebytes on the Server I also ran Kaspersky TDSSKiller on there, both of which found nothing. Can anyone suggest anything else??

    thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,057
    Provided Answers: 1
    What is the operating system and service pack level?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Alpine Califormia
    Posts
    1,789
    Windows Server 2003 Service pack 2

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,057
    Provided Answers: 1
    Have you used this Process Explorer It is a lot better than task manager.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    128
    Provided Answers: 1
    Process Explorer is a very good tool which I use often.

    BUT it will not help you in any way to find if a RootKit exists on your Server unless you happen to know specifically what process name the RootKit might be running under.

    Even then, it will not help you to permanently remove the RootKit.

    If you do a Google search for RootKit you will find a number of tools which all advertize that do the job better than their competition. With that in mind, I'd suggest that you try one or two.

    The one that I have used is ThreatFire
    It also claims to be better than the others, but cannot certify that claim.

    I am guessing that if your other tools have not found a RootKit problem there is a high probability that there is none and that your SQL Server performance problems come from another source. But it doesn't hurt to keep looking.

    Did your SQL Server use to work with acceptable performance and now no longer does so?
    If so, then what changed?
    I'd look towards that as at least a contributing factor (if not the absolute cause itself) in less performance.

    In general most SQL Server performance issues are caused by a poorly 'tuned' SQL Server and/or an application developed in a manner which does not efficiently utilize the SQL Server - a problem which is magnified as data table size increases.

    With that in mind I'd recommend getting a SQL Server tune-up (there should be some contractor/consultant in your area who can do this).
    Check to see if the various SQL Server database parameters are set to optimally use the Server resources so that you don't 'bottle neck' your performance with un-expected resource utilization.

    Good Luck

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