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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    2

    Question Unanswered: Creating a database-driven website

    Hello everyone,

    i need to create a database driven website, so i installed mysql , php and dreamweaver.

    For starters where do i need to put the php files (downloaded in a zip-file)?

    then if i go to mysql workbench 5.2 CE i can see that the server is up and running, but if I try to connect via the mysql connection in dreamweaver , then i can't. After searching the web and watching a lot of tutorials, i still didn't find the solution and by now i'm kinda confused due to all the different programs, like do you need apach or IIS ect..

    Can somebody pleaaaaaase tell me how to start a simple database driven website that i can use to upload pics and information (about the pics).

    Greetz Jirko

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    15,579
    Provided Answers: 54
    Just curious, but have you checked into either Drupal, XOOPS, Joomla, or WordPress? These packages are better than most people will ever be able to write, and they are DESIGNED from the ground up to be customized so you can add any functionality that isn't already provided.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Phelan View Post
    Just curious, but have you checked into either Drupal, XOOPS, Joomla, or WordPress? These packages are better than most people will ever be able to write, and they are DESIGNED from the ground up to be customized so you can add any functionality that isn't already provided.

    -PatP
    No i have not, but the examples that you gave are all CMS, and what do they exactly do?
    how can i use them for my website?

    greetz
    Last edited by TheJizzer; 01-26-12 at 13:08.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    out on a limb
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    Provided Answers: 59
    it depends on what you are trying to do and how you plan on setting up the site.
    you will definitely need an server (whether thats IIS, Apache or somethign else is up to you. if you are using PHP as your scriptong environemnt then Apache is probably as good as you need / good as you get. there can be more difficulties in seting up IIS to run with PHP and MySQL.

    files go in a specific directory in the webserver (precisely where depends on the webserver configuration.

    for development purposes you have a choice as to whether you want to develop on your remote (the ISP's) server or develop on your own system and then upload the files as required. Dreamweaver used to have a very neat FTP extension which handled the file transfer.

    if you are thinking of setting up a development system (ie web server, database server and so on then I'd strongly recommend XAMPP to beginners it eases a lot of the potential bottlenecks and pitfalls. you still need to secure the MySQL server following their recommended guidelines.


    in an Apache installation web files usually go in the htdocs directory. but your XAMPP installation should help you.

    if you choose to use Dreamweaver then it offers the choice of keeping your own files outside the webserver(s) but transfer files as and when you need. personally if you are developing on your own machine I'd store files inside your tewst server['s directory.

    unless you 'have' to roll your own solution I'd strongly recommend that you investigate to see if the CMS's mentioned above can do most if not all of what you want
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    28
    This book (no affiliation) might be of use to you...

    Building your own Database-driven Website

    ...available as an e-book.

    healdem is right, though. Most of the 'projects' out there are written by folks (as in multiple, usually) who have a lot more time/experience coding than say, you or I starting out. Still, it might be worth getting a basic understanding of what does go on 'behind the scenes' so to speak. The book linked to above does spend some time going over setting up a development environment, which sounds like it'd definitely be of help to you.

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