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Thread: Oracle backup

  1. #1
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    Unanswered: Oracle backup

    Hi all members
    I have a data base in non achieve mode so plz any body tell me how to take backup of the data base. i normally use import and export for backup but some body told me that it's not a reliable way if any body known another way for backup so plz tell me

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    This is Oracle 10g R2 book index. In there you'll find several "Backup ..." books - read them. Start with Basics, move on to Reference, and finally Advanced User's Guide.

    If you use different version, go to Search and Download Oracle Database, Application Server, and Collaboration Suite Documentation and find the same books relevant for your version.

  3. #3
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    Sep 2009
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    Thanks for reply
    If i stop the database and copy the entire database folder and files and paste it another location and again start the database can u use this method for database backup

  4. #4
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    Thanks for reply
    If i stop the database and copy the entire database folder and files and paste it another location and again start the database can i u use this method for database backup and recovery

  5. #5
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    You can, but the 'backup' will only be as up to date as at the time it was copied. I use this as an easy way to restore a training database every night, once the courses have finished, so that the database is ready for the following day's courses. Make a master copy of the database by stopping it & copying the datafiles & the redo logs to another location. Then each night I stop the database, copy the 'Master copy' datafiles & redo logs back to their original location, & restart the database.

    If you are hoping to run the database in a new location then don't forget that the control files will need recreating.
    90% of users' problems can be resolved by punching them - the other 10% by switching off their PCs.

  6. #6
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    I see that you are copying files OS level to make your backup. It is OK if you have database down during the whole backup process. But you must maintain your own backup scripts.

    Another solution is to use Oracle backup tool: RMAN
    With RMAN and a couple of commands (or just the “backup” command if you agree with RMAN defaults) you can backup your database in a more efficient way.

  7. #7
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    Sep 2009
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    Hi all
    I stopped the data base and copied the oradata folder and paste another

  8. #8
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    Hi all
    I stopped the data base and copied the oradata folder and paste another location so how it is possible that if i replace the other database oradata folder with copied oradata folder can it work with new database and if yes then how i connect with new database any changing in pfile or controlfile etc

  9. #9
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    Hi Oryazi,

    If you just do an OS copy of your orada folder, you are in trouble because Oracle config files and control files are still configured with paths for the original folder.
    Note, if it is in another machine but with the same folder path, it should work.

    This is why I advise you to use the RMAN backup utility. Using RMAN, you can do a database backup, restore it on the same machine or another one and you also can duplicate using a new SID. All of that is described in the RMAN documentation.

  10. #10
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    I thought you wanted to backup a database, not clone it. If you want to clone a database, then you need to:

    1. Create a new database in the new location. (You only need to do this once, unless you want to create lots of cloned databases.)
    2. Replace the data files & redo logs for the new database with the files you've copied from your original database.
    3. Create new control file/s.
    4. Startup new database - you may be prompted to do media recovery, in which case point Oracle to the location of the redo logs.

    However, based on your posts so far, I strongly suggest that you consider using RMAN & let Oracle do the hard work for you.
    90% of users' problems can be resolved by punching them - the other 10% by switching off their PCs.

  11. #11
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    >If you want to clone a database, then you need to:
    what about duplicate ORACLE_SID on same system?
    SID exists in more than just control files.
    You can lead some folks to knowledge, but you can not make them think.
    The average person thinks he's above average!
    For most folks, they don't know, what they don't know.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by anacedent View Post
    >If you want to clone a database, then you need to:
    what about duplicate ORACLE_SID on same system?
    SID exists in more than just control files.
    Agreed - I was using my setup as an example, where the 'new' database is always on a different system.

    (Another reason to use RMAN )
    90% of users' problems can be resolved by punching them - the other 10% by switching off their PCs.

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