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  1. #1
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    Question Sql DBA or DB2 DBA?

    After completing my engineering i was offered a job as SQL DBA. I did Certifications in SQL Server 2005 and 2008( mcts). It's been 10 months i have been working on sql. There is an opportunity for me to switch to DB2. I need to learn it from scratch and i have the time to do so.
    I'am not sure about the market trend and the demand plus salaries of these two technologies. Pls. advise me on this- whether i should stick to MS sql or switch to DB2???

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    I've moved this thread to a more appropriate forum. The DBForums Suggestions & Feedback - dBforums forum is really for users to offer suggestions and feedback about the DBForums website, not a place for users to get suggestions and feedback about their ideas. You ought to get more appropriate replies in this forum.

    Without knowing a lot more about you, your goals, and your current opportunities all I can offer is general advice. You'll need to take this advice with considerable skepticism, because I can't have enough insight to understand all of your options and the possible ramifications of any particular course of action.

    DB2 and MS-SQL are not that far apart in terms of syntax and general coding practices. They both follow the ISO standard pretty closely in most respects. I perceive the major syntactical differences to be in date and string handling, and each of them has strong and weak points.

    The underlying architecture of the two is quite different. DB2 and especially zOS DB2 tends to closely model the hardware at the lower levels... This tends to force the DBA to have a lot of awareness of the hardware, but also allows them to wring the last iota of performance from the hardware too.

    In general, I recommend as much knowledge as possible. Whether you choose to pursue depth or breadth of knowledge depends more on you and your character than any other single point. I've found that clients and employers tend to value breadth over depth the vast majority of the time, but when they need depth they need it badly and are willing to pay handsomely for it. Each has its own benefits, but especially early in your career I would recommend breadth first.

    Once again, keep in mind that my comments are general. They reflect what I've seen, and they ought to apply to you too but there are too many things that I can't know to be sure of that. Use your best judgment!

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  3. #3
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    Yes...and through some Oracle in there too,

    While you're at it Learn COBOL

    Ain't to many COBOL/ DB2 z/OS guys out there


    anymore..they all died
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
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    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  4. #4
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    check that...there are a few of us left
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
    dbForums Member List
    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Phelan View Post
    This tends to force the DBA to have a lot of awareness of the hardware, but also allows them to wring the last iota of performance from the hardware too.
    -PatP

    You Funny...maybe the 1% do/understand
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
    dbForums Member List
    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    I wouldn't learn DB2 at the expense of learning MSSQL.
    I don't see the market for DB2 experience being as strong.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  7. #7
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    My vote is for DB2 - runs on all platforms.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by db2girl View Post
    My vote is for DB2 - runs on all platforms.
    Of course you would my dear...

    I'm suggesting to learn them all...only took 30 years

    still a little fuzzy on Oracle
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
    dbForums Member List
    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    5
    I see a lot fewer DB2 postings than I do SQL Server.

    DB2 is fine as long as you have some geographical flexibility or live near a major tech area (e.g., San Fran).

    DB2 does pay more (as does Oracle). But that's because both are typically used in larger companies. DB2's strength is still mainframe and big Unix.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    72
    Useful to know - DB2 and SQL server ( and Oracle). Focus on 1 as Primary Skill , the other as Secondary skills

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Phelan View Post
    I've moved this thread to a more appropriate forum. The DBForums Suggestions & Feedback - dBforums forum is really for users to offer suggestions and feedback about the DBForums website, not a place for users to get suggestions and feedback about their ideas. You ought to get more appropriate replies in this forum.

    Without knowing a lot more about you, your goals, and your current opportunities all I can offer is general advice. You'll need to take this advice with considerable skepticism, because I can't have enough insight to understand all of your options and the possible ramifications of any particular course of action.

    DB2 and MS-SQL are not that far apart in terms of syntax and general coding practices. They both follow the ISO standard pretty closely in most respects. I perceive the major syntactical differences to be in date and string handling, and each of them has strong and weak points.

    The underlying architecture of the two is quite different. DB2 and especially zOS DB2 tends to closely model the hardware at the lower levels... This tends to force the DBA to have a lot of awareness of the hardware, but also allows them to wring the last iota of performance from the hardware too.

    In general, I recommend as much knowledge as possible. Whether you choose to pursue depth or breadth of knowledge depends more on you and your character than any other single point. I've found that clients and employers tend to value breadth over depth the vast majority of the time, but when they need depth they need it badly and are willing to pay handsomely for it. Each has its own benefits, but especially early in your career I would recommend breadth first.

    Once again, keep in mind that my comments are general. They reflect what I've seen, and they ought to apply to you too but there are too many things that I can't know to be sure of that. Use your best judgment!

    -PatP

    Thanks for ur suggestion. I really liked how you have put the breadth and lenght factor. I think i should go for db2.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Kaiser View Post
    Yes...and through some Oracle in there too,

    While you're at it Learn COBOL
    Ohk........but I DON'T see a market for Cobol in India.

  13. #13
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    You should learn db2 just to see how quickly you can assimilate new ideas and syntax.
    Over the course of your career you are going to throw away more knowledge than you currently have anyway.

  14. #14
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    And the winner is DB2!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitaman View Post
    You should learn db2 just to see how quickly you can assimilate new ideas and syntax.
    Over the course of your career you are going to throw away more knowledge than you currently have anyway.
    I don't understand one should be a master of one trade or jack of all?!

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