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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1

    Unanswered: Which is Best Software for DataBase

    I am going to develop a Company Data Base. Which have all Employes data like salaries "Basic Salary" plus "Expenses (i) Fixed allowances, (ii) Variable allowances, and (iii) miscellaneous expenses." We will also make forms and reports etc
    It will not use for web.
    Which software should we use?

    Ms Access?
    Sql Server?
    Oracle?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    47

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by RAFSOft View Post
    I am going to develop a Company Data Base. Which have all Employes data like salaries "Basic Salary" plus "Expenses (i) Fixed allowances, (ii) Variable allowances, and (iii) miscellaneous expenses." We will also make forms and reports etc
    It will not use for web.
    Which software should we use?

    Ms Access?
    Sql Server?
    Oracle?
    oracle and sqlserver will best suit your need

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    12,592
    Provided Answers: 1
    Any database will handle those requirements.
    What you need to think about is how your data will be used.
    How many simultaneous users?
    How large do you expect the database to get?
    What is your corporate IT environment like.
    How geographically disperse are the users of this data?

    Its very possible that SQL Server (and almost certainly Oracle) are overkill for what you want to do, and a simple program like MS Access would suffice. If licensing fees are an issue, you could use MySQL.

    So again, your choice of DB platform has virtually nothing to do with the data model you are implementing.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    221B Baker St.
    Posts
    486
    Suggest you look on the internet as there are many "sample" database structures available. You don't really care about which dbms was used as long as the definitions are in SQL. No sense starting completely from scratch. Then you can enhance the database definition as needed to meet your requirement.

    Then concern yourself with concurrent users, data volume, availability requirements, backup/recovery strategies, secutiry, etc and then pick a dbms that will work for you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Chicago, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    601
    As the others have alluded-to, the database software you use will depend upon many factors.

    But let's be straight, if you have to come to an internet forum to ask what kind of database software to use, and the requirements you have given us are for four fields of data, your requirements are not likely incredibly heavy.

    As such, assuming your not hiding something from us, Microsoft Access will do just fine.

    And given what you have told us, SQL Server and Oracle would specifically be the wrong choice for you.

    Access has the advantage on not only being a database system, it also has a form generation system, a report writing system, a programming environment, etc.

    Oracle and SQL Server are only database systems. Of course they are very sophisticated and capable database systems, but do you really need an aircraft carrier when the Staten Island Ferry (or just a row boat) will do just fine?

    If done well (and all systems, including Oracle and SQL Server need to be done well), an Access system can be incredibly powerful.

    And, with Access, you can model your application, get it up and running, improve it, grow with it, etc., without the tremendous expense of the other environments. Then, if the functionality is what you want, or your needs grow, you can always upgrade to SQL Server.

    I whole hardedly recommend Access.
    Ken

    Maverick Software Design

    (847) 864-3600 x2

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    12,592
    Provided Answers: 1
    Access does not play well in an enterprise environment, with more than five or six simultaneous users sharing its data file across a network. If that does not describe your business environment, then Access will be fine.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

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