Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    4

    Talking Do I just need a kick in the pants?

    I found this oasis of useful information in a desert of data and wasteland of words. I have been really kicking around the idea of changing 'careers' <being sarcastic>. I say that because I really dont have a career per se. Ive been working my job for 17 years now.
    I came here for advice and I received wonderful feedback from two of the 'old souls' around here I think papadi and one more sweetheart. Look at New Members and Introductions for my thread..."I want to be a cowgirl"... to find out of whom I speak. Anyhoo, I have three degrees in IT and Ive always liked working with databases. I really thought I would be steeped in the IT world by now, but I got sidetracked and way way off the beaten path to DB development. Now, Im wrestling with how to break in without going broke. Im having a hard time knowing where to start. Even harder time starting. Ive got a 'foundation'. I could write a basic SQL statement right now, but I need to know where to stick the statement.
    Enters, <<<cape flying>>>SQL Server 2012<<<superhero music>>. I am at a loss. I have two books right now, A Beginners Guide to SQL Server 2012 and T-SQL 2008 Tutorial. I sat down to read the beginners guide and I swear the letters and words starting breakdancing and bellydancing on the page and at one point I swear another language besides english kicked in. Thats the first page of Ch 3 SQL Server management Studio. < I skipped ahead to the meat>. I have been checking out books and looking up tutorials online for at least 2 months now, even downloaded SQL Server(the free one) and the SQL that everyone seems to like, I cant call the name right now but its free too. I have yet to write a line of code, or even peek in the Mgt Studio. I need a push.
    Tell me something people, do I have to LUV LUV this developing thing to actually do it. If so, how do I know I love it. how do I know if Im any good? I work better when I have a concrete jumping off place, even if its a cliff, i know I can plummet in a straight line. Nothing but ground.
    So out of the 6K or some odd number of people that float around this site, I know someone can help me.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    5,800
    How about this: Come up with an idea for a simple(ish) database, and try to develop it. Usual topics are Record/Book collections (easy), Tournament/School Class scheduling (harder). If you can do those, and come up with what are likely to be the most likely queries, you should be well on your way to being able to develop in SQL.

    That said, front end development is an entirely different matter. If your goal is to become a SQL developer/modeler, then concentrate on the database side of things. Write stored procedures for entering, and looking up data. Once you get paired with someone who concentrates on front end designs, then you can learn how the two interact.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,057
    Is this you Birmingham - Amanda Marshall

    I would be more inclined to keep your day job, and start a second part time career.
    Find something that really interests you and build a web based application around it. You can either sell the application, or allow clients to subscribe to it, or provide it freely with advertisements.
    At best it will go viral, at worst you will have gained a lot of experience, somewhere in the middle is a new car or a decent holiday.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    221B Baker St.
    Posts
    486
    two of the 'old souls' around here I think papadi and one more sweetheart
    Yup, 'twas i & Pat Phelan.
    I would be more inclined to keep your day job,
    Totally agree.

    Suggest attending some evening or weekend training to "jump-start" yourself.

    Good luck!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
    Posts
    15,579
    If Microsoft SQL Server is your tool of choice, then you NEED to get acquinted with SQL PASS. The Professional Association for SQL Server is a member driven/managed/etc user group for Microsoft SQL Server and the related tools and technologies. There are dozens of online chapters that will help you get started with almost every phase of using SQL Server. There are hundreds of local chapters where you can meet like-minded geeks fairly often (usually once a month), without having to do extensive travel. There are also many "SQL Saturday" events where you can meet people actively involved on the state and regional level. The primary purpose behind SQL PASS is to get people together and to give them free or affordable eduction and an opportunity to network with each other.

    There are many strong SQL database engines on the market today. Most of them are capable of tackling any real world business problem reasonably well and at a tolerable cost. For someone just getting started, with an eye toward getting paid for their skills and services, I think that SQL Server is probably your best bet... There is relatively little hurdle to get into the product, and it will take you to some of the largest systems being used commercially today.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    on the wrong server
    Posts
    8,835
    Hmmm. I am a sql developer with zero IT degrees, and I am not sure how I got here. I was out for drinks during the dotcom boom and I sobered up around the time of the financial collapse. everything is else is a blur.

    Don't give up on your dreams even if the music industry is crap.

    The whole correlation between being a good musician and great developer never really made much sense to me, because the average developer has little music or art in his or her soul.
    “If one brings so much courage to this world the world has to kill them or break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” Earnest Hemingway, A Farewell To Arms.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    221B Baker St.
    Posts
    486
    But many of the really good ones do . . .

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •