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Thread: learning sequel

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Smile Unanswered: learning sequel

    hi everyone.
    now im new to the forum so i dont know if ive posted this into the correct area.....
    Im wanting a career change and want to get back into developing/programming.
    after graduating i had a change of direction with stuff that came up in my personal life.
    im 30, and ive been a sales manager at a retail company, but just havent got my heart in it anymore.
    i want to get into sharepoint but before that i would like to learn sql. because im at work and with family and kids i dont have much time. i will be putting in rougly about 30 hours per week into it.
    now i really want your expert help about where would be the best place to get good training/resourses/materials for learning sql first.
    help will be appreciated alot.

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Do you have something on your PC that supports SQL?

    Working with SQL implies there is an underlying database for SQL to talk to.

    There are several free offerings that you can dowload and install. To name a few, there are MySql, IBM DB2-Express, and Microsoft SQLServer.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by papadi View Post
    There are several free offerings that you can dowload and install. To name a few, there are MySql, IBM DB2-Express, and Microsoft SQLServer.
    Don't forget PostgreSQL - especially from a learning point of view as it much more standard compliant than MySQL or SQL Server.
    I will not read nor answer questions where the SQL code is messy and not formatted properly using [code] tags: http://www.dbforums.com/misc.php?do=bbcode#code

    Tips for good questions:

    http://tkyte.blogspot.de/2005/06/how...questions.html
    http://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/SlowQueryQuestions
    http://catb.org/esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by papadi View Post
    Do you have something on your PC that supports SQL?

    Working with SQL implies there is an underlying database for SQL to talk to.

    There are several free offerings that you can dowload and install. To name a few, there are MySql, IBM DB2-Express, and Microsoft SQLServer.
    Hi papadi, thanks for reply.
    Well just bought a new desktop i7, and i will be installing probably microsoft SQL server...

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by shammat View Post
    Don't forget PostgreSQL - especially from a learning point of view as it much more standard compliant than MySQL or SQL Server.
    Hi shammat thanks for replying.,
    Would you recommend PostgreSQL over the rest..

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhd.m View Post
    Would you recommend PostgreSQL over the rest..
    It depends on what you want to learn. If you want to get knowledge about Microsoft SQL Server, then apparently you need to stick with that.

    If you want to learn SQL in a broader sense, I'd go for PostgreSQL. SQL Server does have several quirks that - in my personal opinion - doesn't make it a good fit for a first contact with SQL as a general language.

    Don't get me wrong SQL Server - especially 2012 - is a good DBMS and if you know you are going to stick in the Microsoft world it's probably a good start.
    I will not read nor answer questions where the SQL code is messy and not formatted properly using [code] tags: http://www.dbforums.com/misc.php?do=bbcode#code

    Tips for good questions:

    http://tkyte.blogspot.de/2005/06/how...questions.html
    http://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/SlowQueryQuestions
    http://catb.org/esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by shammat View Post
    It depends on what you want to learn. If you want to get knowledge about Microsoft SQL Server, then apparently you need to stick with that.

    If you want to learn SQL in a broader sense, I'd go for PostgreSQL. SQL Server does have several quirks that - in my personal opinion - doesn't make it a good fit for a first contact with SQL as a general language.

    Don't get me wrong SQL Server - especially 2012 - is a good DBMS and if you know you are going to stick in the Microsoft world it's probably a good start.
    I think
    If I'm going to get into Microsoft share point I would be most likely sticking to SQL server..
    I think for me it would be a good start for SQL server..

  8. #8
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    What are best places to get training on . Any recommendations

  9. #9
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    This depends on where you want to focus.

    There are many independent training vendors (that are Misrosoft certified) that conduct SQL Server training. Depending on where you are located, there will be different training opportunities avalible nearby.

    If you have little or no experience with SQL, suggest an introductory class rather than advanced.

    To me, two of the most valuable benefits of class-room training are:
    An instructor who can answer questions in real-time.
    Making contacts you get to know and can talk with later.

  10. #10
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    A good start would be to never refer to it as "sequel" again.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  11. #11
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    There are all kinds of SQL Server training. Each flavor of trainign caters to a specific target market, works well for that market, and may or may not work for other markets. The trick is to not to find the "best" training, but what training is the "best" for you!

    How do you learn? Do you prefer to read books and experiment? Do you prefer a classroom setting, where you can focus 100% on learning and not be bothered by normal day-to-day issues while you're learning? Do you prefer packages that allow you a hybrid experience like CBT that allow you to do both? We really need to understand what works for you and where you are located (if you prefer classrom situations) in order to give you good suggestions.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

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