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  1. #1
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    Unanswered: DB2 licensing question - two DB2 installs on same physical computer

    Hi,
    I have 4-core Intel server with VMware ESX installed on this server. There is virtual machine that has defined all 4-cores.
    Inside this virtual machine there is Windows 2008 installed with DB2 Enterprise Edition. DB2 is licensed by CPU core (PVU)
    model, so DB2 using all of 4-cores. Our company bought a DB2 license and are selling services to our customers.

    Now I have got a requirement that on the same physical 4-core server create a new virtual machine that will also be defined
    the SAME!!! 4-cores. Inside this new virtual machine system Windows 2008 will be installed with DB2 Enterprise.

    Licensing question. I am using the same 4 CPU cores by two DB2 installs. Do I need to buy the new DB2 license for new DB2 install?
    Regards
    Last edited by grofaty; 10-26-12 at 05:55.

  2. #2
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    Each virtual machine is considered a separate server for DB2 licensing purposes and you would need a separate DB2 License for each VM. So it makes sense to just create two DB2 instances on the same VM, which means the instances and database are operating independently. However, if you did create 2 separate virtual servers, you should make sure that each one can only sue 2 CPU cores each, instead of both sharing all 4 CPU cores.

    But for such a small server (4 CPU cores), it is big waste of money to use DB2 ESE. There are other editions (Workgroup, Express, etc) that are much cheaper, unless you need one of the few features that ESE has, but that the others don't have. You could also use DB2 Express-C which is completely free, although the list of excluded features is bit larger (although you may not ever need them).
    M. A. Feldman
    IBM Certified DBA on DB2 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows
    IBM Certified DBA on DB2 for z/OS and OS/390

  3. #3
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    @Marcus_A, my question is only HIPOTETICAL solution and I am perfectly aware that this is in no way perfect solution and I fully agree with your arguments.

    What I would like to get is ONLY licensing answer. My coworker discussed with two IBM employees and he got two different answers! One IBM employee said exactly what you said, two virtual machines two DB2 servers two licenses, no matter how virtual machines are configured.

    But another IBM employee said: If you have two virtual machines and each of one consumes 2-cores, then you need to pay 2-licenses, because different physical hardware will be used (so far no problem). But in my hypothetical case using two virtual machines both using the SAME physical 4-cores then only SINGLE DB2 license is needed, because DB2 is licenses by physical hardware in use.

    Now I am confused.

  4. #4
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    In terms of actual license installs, you will need to install the same license file on two different VM machines (or two different licenses, one on each machine). But for the cost of licensing, it doesn't really matter how many licenses you have (or are installed), it matters the number of total PVU's (assuming you have ESE licensed by PVU's).

    I am not sure how IBM handles a situation where two different VM's share the same CPU's, especially under Windows. Under AIX, where there is an initial allocation of CPU's to each VM (LPAR), but each VM can dynamically borrow CPU's from other VM's (according to limits setup in LPAR config), you only have to pay for the initial allocation. Not sure how this works on the VM product you have.
    M. A. Feldman
    IBM Certified DBA on DB2 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows
    IBM Certified DBA on DB2 for z/OS and OS/390

  5. #5
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    Provided Answers: 1
    When DB2 is running in a virtual machine, it is virtual CPUs that count in terms of licensing. So, if you have 2 VM, each with 4 VCPUs, you'll need to license enough PVUs to cover 8 CPUs.
    ---
    "It does not work" is not a valid problem statement.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Hi,
    I have been looking deeply into sub-capacity (virtualization) licensing and found out the following PDF document (from year 2009, I hope this info is still valid): Sub-capacity (Virtualization) License Counting Rules - VMware Virtualization Environment and on page 6 (see attachment) there is an example of 8-physical-core server (referred as Full Capacity) using 3 VMs (referred as Virtualization Capacity) in the following way: VM_1 is using 4-virtual-cores, VM_2 is using 4-virtual-cores and VM_3 is using 1 virtual-core. So total of 9-virtual-cores running on 8-physical-cores.

    Slide 6: "For above example, the PVU Virtualization Capacity licensing requirement is based on the maximum number of vCPUs (cores) in the VM(s) available to a product. License Rule: lower of the Virtualization Capacity or Full (Physical) Capacity available in the Server.

    Taking into account the above rule: 8-physical-cores vs. 9-virtual-cores and license is 8!!! cores. There is general rule: one physical core or one virtual core requires one PVU license, so in slide-page-6 case 8-times PVU license is required.

    So in my case (first post in this thread) 4-physical-cores vs. 8-virtual-cores and only 4-times PVU license is required. In this case I see Marcus_A suggestion (second post in this thread) 2-virtual-computers both consuming 2-virtual-cores would result in the same 4-time PVU license fee.

    Any comment is hugely welcome.
    Regards
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails license_physical_vs_virtual_cores.png  
    Last edited by grofaty; 10-30-12 at 13:41.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    335
    Hi there,

    yep, if the number of virtual cores is greater than the number of physical cores, you just have to license the physical cores.
    If you have a ESX-Cluster you have to license all the Cores in the Cluster if you don't go for Subcapacity.

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