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  1. #1
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    Unanswered: Likely compatibility issues moving to 2013?

    Hi folks

    I have an Access 2007 application that is in highly productive use in a number of independent locations. However, now that 2013 is out, new potential users can't just buy a 2010 licence and get a free downgrade to 2007, which gives me a problem. Do I make my next release supported in 2013 only, and ask all my users to upgrade? Do I commit to supporting both 2007 and 2013 going forward? Or do I give up on new users altogether?

    To help me decide, it would be really helpful if the collective wisdom of this forum could give me some clues about where I might find compatibility issues. If there aren't too many, maybe I could continue to develop in 2007 and just do a targetted test in 2013 for each new release...

    The application is all in .accdb files, one backend and typically two or three front-ends per location. There is quite a lot of VBA code providing application intelligence. There is one principal data entry form but about 20 other forms for specialist views.

    I know the ideal answer is - just test it all thoroughly - but I know that will take me several days and some pointers to the likely hot spots would be very helpful. Plus, this is a not-for-profit situation and I don't have a 2013 licence to hand, and if I know it's a non-starter then I can save some of our precious cash.

    Does anyone have any clues or experience to help?

    TIA

  2. #2
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    or deploy the app as is using runtime a free Access 'interpreter'
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  3. #3
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    Sadly runtime doesn't cut it ... at least one of the "clients" needs to have the full licenced version.

  4. #4
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    The point to keep in mind, I think, is that people running 2010 and 2013 should have no problem at all running apps developed in 2007, but the converse is not true! Granted, their are new features/functions and capabilities available in the last two versions, but very few, I think, that come under the category of 'just gotta have!'

    As far as 2013 goes, my philosophy, with Microsoft apps, has always been to stay at least one version behind the latest, until that version has been out there for a year or two, and most of the bugs are resolved. When clients are having problems with their custom designed apps, they generally aren't going to buy that the fault lies with Microsoft, they're going to figure it lies with the developer.

    The Boys of Redmond and their products have their faults, but they've rarely been accused of not providing backwards compatibility for their products! Get a copy of 2010, or 2013, or both, and play with them, but for productivity continue to develop in v2007, for the present.

    Linq ;0)>
    Hope this helps!

    The problem with making anything foolproof...is that fools are so darn ingenious!

    All posts/responses based on Access 2003/2007

  5. #5
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    The Boys of Redmond and their products have their faults, but they've rarely been accused of not providing backwards compatibility for their products!
    Application.FileSearch

    I spent a few days rewriting two related subroutines that made extensive use of the above method, and then failed when executed in Access/Excel 2010...
    10% of magic is knowing something that no-one else does. The rest is misdirection.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2010
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    @Linq:Hmmm, you are more confident than I am, especially as regards Access... For example, support for ADP files has been dropped in 2013. As it happens I don't use those, but it's an example of non-compatibility.

    @weejas: thanks, that's exactly the kind of thing I was looking for.

    Anyone got any more?

  7. #7
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    however using ADPs was deprecated way back, certainly by 2007. so anybody developing ADP applications from that date on would be foolish if they intend buying new copies of Access.
    y'cant have it both ways

    youcan continue using ADP's assuming you don't use the most recent versions of Access. you cna continue using ADP's if your environment supports it.
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  8. #8
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    Access 2010 will quite happily work with ADP files. We have enough of them here...
    10% of magic is knowing something that no-one else does. The rest is misdirection.

  9. #9
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    OK, drifting slightly OT here! I gave ADP as a counterexample to Linq's optimism - as I said, I don't use them. My point is that Microsoft don't guarantee compatibility, and even if they did I wouldn't just take their word for it.

    What I'm looking for is some experience of people who have tried to take 2007 applications forward and the issues they've come across, like weejas' example.

    Any more of those?

    Or, conversely, any examples of reasonably complex applications that have just worked when taken forward from 2007 to 2013?


    TIA.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
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    1

    Access 2007 to later

    Quote Originally Posted by CeejayDBF View Post
    OK, drifting slightly OT here! I gave ADP as a counterexample to Linq's optimism - as I said, I don't use them. My point is that Microsoft don't guarantee compatibility, and even if they did I wouldn't just take their word for it.

    What I'm looking for is some experience of people who have tried to take 2007 applications forward and the issues they've come across, like weejas' example.

    Any more of those?

    Or, conversely, any examples of reasonably complex applications that have just worked when taken forward from 2007 to 2013?


    TIA.
    I worked for a large organisation where the applications were originally in Access 2007. As new users were put on, the IT department gave them Office 2010 including sometimes Access 2010.

    Hi

    One issue that you need to aware of.

    When viewing accdb. database tables in Access 2007 or in Access 2010 , then it is not easy to see (or may not be possible at all!) to see which version of Access the .accdb tables were created in or modified by. (It could be by an Access 2007 user or by an Access 2010 user). This is the worst Microsoft bungle I have come across after many years of developing in MS Access. Here I am referring to the .accdb table format introduced with Access 2007. However, if you are using the older .mdb table format, then you will not have this problem.

    This above table problem has the potential to cause no end of problems if mixing 2007 and 2010.

    when mixing versions, and a 2010 user modified the tables, the 2007 developer and 2007 users will have problems.
    and force you to go restore earlier unmolested table(s).

    To overcome, you either need to have all the users (and all developers) on 2007, or all the users (and all developers) on 2010.
    and then also convert all the database tables at around the same time to use the one version.

    I would not be surprised if 2013 had a similar problem with their accdb table - have not yet checked this out.
    motto (if possible) use (the same) version for all users, developers and tables and avoid a bunch of problems.

    This may not be relevant to your situation but is something to be aware of.

    Regards
    Ralph

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