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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Unanswered: I have a new book at the printers ..

    I have a new book at the printers and my editor wants to send out chapters for endorsements on the covers and other places. The book is a survey of non-traditional, non-SQL databases (GIS, key-value, columnar, Hadoop, textbase, NFNF, IMS, OLTP, OLAP, etc).

    Let me know if you have expertise in these areas and want to get fame, glory and a free beer for a short write up.

  2. #2
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    IMS, VSAM, are non-traditional? Heck, better tell Intel to change the work flow db's to traditional....non-hierarchical files.

  3. #3
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    I already have fame and fortune. Just nobody knows it yet. And I can't buy a friend.

  4. #4
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    I already have fame and fortune. Just nobody knows it yet. And I can't buy a friend.
    People kept telling me to "get a life", so i tried it one weekend. Grossly overrated. And of course you can buy a friend! That is what EBay is for

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by corncrowe View Post
    And I can't buy a friend.
    You just don't know where to shop!

    Joe, check your email.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  6. #6
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    On a serious note ..

    IMS, VSAM, are non-traditional? Heck, better tell Intel to change the work flow db's to traditional....non-hierarchical files.
    I put in ISAM because, like COBOL, it still does the "heavy lifting" in the real world and SQL people have no idea that it exists, much less how it works and its data model. This ignorance is a serious weakness.

    I put in NFNF because PICK, Univers, et al also have a strong niche today. And the pure RDBMS guys (like me when I wear my professor hat) do not know that there is a whole non-First Normal Form relational algebra.

    I put in GIS because it is too often retro-fitted into SQL and this generally stinks.

    I put in Graph databases because they are really cool. And the are used by Obama for parts of PRISM to track disloyal citizens .

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Surrey, UK
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    Did you cover anything on Lotus Notes? *Ducks and runs*
    10% of magic is knowing something that no-one else does. The rest is misdirection.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by corncrowe View Post
    And I can't buy a friend.
    Make me an offer.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by blindman View Post
    Make me an offer.
    Would two eight inch floppy disks be enough? Might still have usable JCL on them.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Provided Answers: 1
    Can you overnight them?
    I will add you to my "friend" list on Facebook upon receipt.

    Also....anybody interested in a pair of eight inch floppy disk?
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  11. #11
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    Jan 2013
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    Also....anybody interested in a pair of eight inch floppy disk?
    I once saw punch cards a "collectables" on EBay and it scared me. But I do have my slide rules in a shadowbox and want to get another box for my abacus collection (Chinese, Japanese pre-WWI, Japanese post-WWI, Russian, American).

    I thought about teaching database with McBee (notched edge) cards for kids.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by blindman View Post
    Can you overnight them?
    I will add you to my "friend" list on Facebook upon receipt.

    Also....anybody interested in a pair of eight inch floppy disk?
    They're sitting at the bottom of the bird cage. I don't need to clean them first, eh?

  13. #13
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    Jun 2003
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    Ohio
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    Some of my earliest memories are of watching cartoons in the basement and hearing my father (a statistician) click-click-click on his abacus in the next room. He was pretty fast, and even after investing in an earlier calculator he will still go back to his abacus for summing up numbers.
    If it's not practically useful, then it's practically useless.

    blindman
    www.chess.com: "sqlblindman"
    www.LobsterShot.blogspot.com

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
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    We didn't have t.v. when I was growing up, so we had to sneak into the back yard of a rich neighbor for our entertainment. Sometimes they were busy doing other entertaining things...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by corncrowe View Post
    We didn't have t.v. when I was growing up, so we had to sneak into the back yard of a rich neighbor
    When I grew up, we didn't have a t.v. nor rich neighbours.

    We made some pocket money by incubating dinosaur eggs and selling the hatchlings. They were something new back then. But it was never enough to buy a t.v. from.

    And yes, we're still using SQL Server 2000/DTS at my office.
    With kind regards . . . . . SQL Server 2000/2005/2012
    Wim

    Grabel's Law: 2 is not equal to 3 -- not even for very large values of 2.
    Pat Phelan's Law: 2 very definitely CAN equal 3 -- in at least two programming languages

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