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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    311
    Provided Answers: 1

    Question Unanswered: Where Does PostgreSQL Fall Short in Ent. Env?

    I love using PostgreSQL for my personal needs and find PostgreSQL to be extremely interesting. It's as simple as you need it to be however it can handle the most complex RDBMS needs / wants.

    Sadly at work we use Oracle 11g Database Server for our in-house applications and honestly we (AKA 'I') just can't stand it. Everything from Oracle seems far more complex and annoying than it should be.

    My question is... for those who have used / understand PostgreSQL far more than I have in a "enterprise environment", can you please let me know where PostgreSQL falls short and how? I'm curious how PostgreSQL runs up against major vendors like Oracle especially when we pay close to $20k p/y for licenses and support.

    Thanks for any info...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    18
    Look in to website enterprisedb.com . They have a PostgreSQL solution that can be compared with Oracle. And it is compatible with oracle so you can easly migrate to pg from oracle.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,933
    Provided Answers: 12
    Quote Originally Posted by CarlosinFL View Post
    My question is... for those who have used / understand PostgreSQL far more than I have in a "enterprise environment", can you please let me know where PostgreSQL falls short and how? I'm curious how PostgreSQL runs up against major vendors like Oracle especially when we pay close to $20k p/y for licenses and support.
    I full understand you

    I think PostgreSQL's SQL features are at least on the same level as Oracle's In some areas actually much better - functions returning result sets are much easier to do and hstore is absolutely amazing. Transactional DDL is something I miss nearly every day in Oracle. And the concept of sequences that "belong" is also extremely useful.

    What Oracle does much better is partitioning. We have some applications using Oracle that have several tables way beyon 100 Million rows. I doubt that Postgres "poor-man's partitioning" could deliver the same results there.

    Also parallel execution of a single statement is something that Postgres does not offer - although in reality I haven't seen that many statements that really benefit from that.

    Another area where Oracle is also much better, is the ability to analyze what is going on in the system. ASH, AWR and related technologies has no match in the Postgres world. (pg_stats_statements is a step in that direction, but it's still a long way for Postgres)

    For high availability I think they are on the same level as well. Oracle's hot standby is pretty much the same as a hot standby in Postgres. There is no technnology like RAC in the Postgres world, but all RAC installations I have seen would have actually been faster with a standby rather than a RAC (because due to the workload the RAC spends a substantial amount of time synchronizing the buffer cache between the two nodes).

    When it comes to support and maintenance I think Postgres is just as good - with the exception that there is noone to "blame". I have reported three bugs over the last 3 or 4 years and for all of them a fix showed up in the next minor release within months. You'd need to pay Oracle a lot of money to get that. Although with Postgres you never have the guarantee that you'll get that response time!

    We have several large applications running happily on Postgres.

    If you need some "visible" names: Skype, Instagram, Zalando and kickz.com are backed by Postgres (although I'm not sure about Skype any more, now that they are owned by Microsoft). NTT is also a big Postgres user but I have no information how they actually use it. But taking into acount that they were the main sponsors of the streaming replication I would guess it's not a small system they are dealing with.

    A longer list of users can be found here: PostgreSQL: PostgreSQL Featured Users
    I will not read nor answer questions where the SQL code is messy and not formatted properly using [code] tags: http://www.dbforums.com/misc.php?do=bbcode#code

    Tips for good questions:

    http://tkyte.blogspot.de/2005/06/how...questions.html
    http://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/SlowQueryQuestions
    http://catb.org/esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

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