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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Is there any current research on the use of different DBMS's in the world?

    I do not know if it is the correct place for this but I would ask of you or get a light to this question, for purposes of undergraduate work fine:

    Is there any current research (or not it fairly outdated) on the use of different DBMS's world?

    I am interested in knowing the use of PostgreSQL.

    Here are some queries to google I made:

    rdbms what is the most used in the world?, rdbms global usage reasearch, rdbms global usage, usage statistics of the world postgresql, statistics by using the postgresql world RDBMS used in the world, usage statistics relational databases worldwide, RDBMS using statistics around world.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    There are many companies that sell "market research" trying to answer these questions. Each one seems to have a slightly different opinion, with reams of surveys, statistics, and impassioned writing.

    If you visit the web sites of the relevant databases, they all seem to have the same conclusion... That their database either is #1 in the world, or that it ought to be!

    In my opinion, each database has some strong and weak points. There is something positively stellar about each one, but the question remains as to whether that stellar point applies to your needs or whether it is simply another interesting footnote.

    As you've probably noticed, the use of search engine to find answers in the cacophony of marketing mayhem isn't very productive. Your search will find you many answers, but not many usable or valuable answers!

    There are some opinions that I value at TDWI -The Data Warehousing Institute that cover large (usually expensive) database engines that are well supported and well suited for large tasks. There are many projects with useful database information that can be sorted out from them in places like SourceForge - Download, Develop and Publish Free Open Source Software for smaller, more nimble database engines.

    The underlying problem is that databases serve MANY different needs, so no one product can serve every need well. Once you determine what tasks you need to accomplish you can find the database engines that suit those tasks. If you spend enough time, you can find the "best fit" but any "good fit" will usually do.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    4
    Thanks for the reply.

    I am developing my final graduation work going and chose PostgreSQL for this. I wonder if there is some usage statistics PostgreSQL the world (how many companies use this DBMS compared to other systems available on the market, opensource or paid) to be cited in my work.

  4. #4
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    Probably the most solidly factual numbers that you could get for free would be post counts from Usenet or a multi-database forum like DBForums. The raw count of posts would give insight into how popular (or possibly how troublesome) a product is, and the number of distinct email addresses or usernames would give insight into how many installations there are for a given product family.

    There are many sites that will give their estimates of the usage for the various products, but I don't know of a single source that was either unbiased or provably correct for that kind of information.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    4
    Thanks for the tip. I will analyze all the information you gave me and chat with my tutor.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    The raw count of posts would give insight into how popular (or possibly how troublesome)
    Or how incompetent the practitioners are.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Like that music of 60's : "That's what I Want, That's what I want."

    DB-Engines Ranking - popularity ranking of database management systems

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    That db-engines ranking site is a great find!

    You'll still need to determine how valid the data the site presents is for your usage and how relevant it is too, but that's a small problem compared to having to develop your own statistics and validate them!

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

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