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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    3

    Unanswered: Need to create timesheet form for project management database

    Good morning. I could use assistance with a project management database. The database is intended to capture the number of hours each employee spends on projects to which they are assigned. I don’t know how to create the timesheet form in which users would enter their hours worked each day on projects to which they are assigned. I have attached a picture of the Access tables (not sure if they’re quite right yet), and a picture of the timesheet form layout I need to create. The timesheet form should:

    --Automatically list the projects to which the employee is assigned (once the employee is selected from a combo box in the form)
    --Calculate the proper dates for each day of the week, and the “week ending” date, based on the current date.
    --The hours worked entered by employees in the timesheet form should populate tblTime.

    Managers will create the projects in tblProjects and assign employees to those projects in tblAssignments. Security needs to be built in later (logins, each employee seeing only their own timesheet, etc), but for now I just need to work out the form. Any help appreciated, thank you.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tables.png   Timesheet Form.png  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    out on a limb
    Posts
    13,692
    Provided Answers: 59
    Dont want to pee on your parade but why reinvent thw wheel. Id suggest you buy a project management package. Heck some of them are free such as project libre. Or buy microsft project. You probably dont need the most recent verssions so have a look on fleabay
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
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    Provided Answers: 54
    I'll second the notion of using one of the existing project management packages.

    There are several reasons that using an existing package makes more sense than writing one yourself:
    1. Project management isn't trivial, the insight that goes into a good package is hard (expensive) to reproduce.
    2. Exchanging data with other PM packages can be hard, re-use the work that others have already done!
    3. A custom built package will cause endless feature requests which will eat your time but deliver very little if any additional value.
    4. All of the packages that I've seen are very reasonably priced and many are completely free.
    Use one of the pre-built packages if you can, it is a far better answer for both you and your users than writing another one!

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    3
    Thank you both for the information. The boss wants a custom solution built in-house. Can't speak to her reasonsing, as it will obviously take me forever.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    In front of the computer
    Posts
    15,579
    Provided Answers: 54
    Install one of the existing free project management apps and show it to your boss. Ask her to help you understand what the problems are with the package.

    I'm willing to bet that she'll be thrilled with it "as is", and that you'll get an "attaboy" for having found such a simple and ingenious solution to her problem! This is how you can move up quickly in an organization by "thinking outside of the box" and finding what management needs even when they can't describe it well. That's a vitally important skill in the IT field.

    Even if she has serious objections to the package, it will give you "talking points" so that she can more quickly communicate what problems she has with the package and that communication will save you hours or days in your project.

    The neat thing about this process is either way (adopting the package or pointing out why your boss doesn't want to use it), both you and the business come out ahead!

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

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