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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    3

    Unanswered: Web based Database

    I've inherited a website which has a number of Access Databases, each about 380Kb in size, these do not have data written to them rather they are used to drive a quotation engine by supplying information to allow a calculation to be completed in Classic ASP.

    Our web host wants these databases upgraded to MS SQL, plus the site has started to return various error code of an unspecified nature.

    Would any one suggest upgrading the SQL, or changing the hosting company or both.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dorset
    Posts
    119
    Why do they want you to move to SQL?

    To fully answer your question try and answer as many of the questions as you can from below:

    What are the databases used for?
    What kind of data do they store?
    How much data do they store now and will they store in the future?
    What is the max number of concurrent users that will access the database?
    How secure does the data need to be?
    Regards
    JD

    Software-Matters

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    15,579
    Provided Answers: 54
    IF you are using the Access databases purely as a way to provide parameters to an ASP engine, then I would fix the underlying design problem and not use any database at all.

    If there is compelling reason to use a database engine, my first thought is to ask someone (you, a designer, or someone else) to re-explain what purpose that serves. My thought here is to challenge the assumption, since I'm pretty sure that there has to be a better way.

    I agree with your web host that using many small databases as a means of moving parameters is a poor choice. Without knowing more about your process (client, web page, ASP server, etc.) I can't offer a good suggestion on how to fix the problem.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    3

    Web Based Database

    Thanks for the answers guys.

    A bit more background on the website and why it has numerous small databases.

    The site is a life insurance quotation system and the databases are used to generate the actual quotation, the user selects from a series of drop down menus, state, age, gender, smoking habit, health and cover required.

    Then using an ASP page and the databases the quotation is generated. Also using the databases it is much easier to up date when the premiums charged change.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Provided Answers: 54
    If you need to persist the data (so that a user can come back in another web session and re-use their data), then I'd recommend using SQL Server. If you need to collect the data and pass it to your calculation routines in a single session, then I'd use vanilla web parts to store and manage the data.

    Depending on how much PII data you collect, you may run into legal or regulatory problems by storing the data in MDB files.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    3
    Each of the databases is used PURELY to generate the quotation, no personal data is written to these databases.

    All that is contained in these databases are ages 18 to 55 and the cost per $1000 of life cover for both smokers and non smokers. Hence the size of about 380Kb per database.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Provided Answers: 54
    If that is the case, then I would recommend that you get the database completely out of the picture. No data storage at all, just take the data entered on the ASP page, send it to your computation engine, then present the results on a new page... No storage used at all!

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

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