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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    163

    Unanswered: Microsoft Access Run Time Application

    Dear Seniors,

    I got the Man hours Access database from my previous boss (Left the Organization), which is in Microsoft Access Run Time application format. I want to modify the reports for my current project and add some modules from my other database. But I could not do the same due to the file format. Could you please help me to sort out this issue. I need to customize the database for my current project.

    Thanks and Regards
    R. Vadivelan
    Thanks and Regards
    R. Vadivelan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    out on a limb
    Posts
    13,692
    Provided Answers: 59
    there is no such thing as a runtime application format. there is such a thign as an encrypted access file format, which can be run in developer Access or runtime Access.The file suffix ends in E, eg mydb.mdE or mydb.accdE

    if you do not have the same application with a file extension ending in B, eg mydb.mdB or mydb.accdB then you are unable to make any design changes to the forms, reports, queries or whatever lodged within that applciation. There are comopany's who may be able to extract the obfuscated information from that file, but its usually hideously expensive and virtually unusable as its deliberately mangled and stripped of all meaning, all comments and so on.

    Just thinking out aloud I wonder if the objects from an MDE/ACCDE can be imported into a MDB/ACCDB, never tried it. and to be honest if it could be done it would be slightly scary, as I deploy applications in the encrypted version to stop tampering with code, and to protect applications if there is an IPR restriction.

    I suspect a far better spend of your developer time would be to trawl through whatever backups you have to see if the MDB/ACCDB did get archived. trawl through that users old computer(s)

    AS to a legal position I would expect it came down to if the employer could prove that the employee deliberately witheld the design master (the mdb/accdb) or whether it got lost in the process. soemtimes that coems dfown to how , or why the employee left the organisation.


    Backups, like fundamental good database design are the cornerstones of any development work in Access (or any other database arena). but when you do take backups prove that they are 'good', periodically re examine the backups and fiels included and make certain they are readable and useful. I know of several places that had a reqular back process that looked great... except that soemtimes areas that should have been backed up weren't, sometimes backups were corrupted because fiels were open or changes were being committed at the time the back was taken). There is no point in having a backup unless you know its 'good'. Id also recommend that you take private copies of of the db whiulst under development so if you screw up somethign you don't have to go back to too old a backup. This is especailly important if you are planning on doing a compact and repair, or releasing a new version of the applciation
    I'd rather be riding on the Tiger 800 or the Norton

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    163
    Hi Healdem,

    Thanks for your response. I tried to import my ACCDR into ACCDB but it not works. May be I will try to contact him via personel number to collect the informations.

    Thanks and Regards
    R. Vadivelan
    Thanks and Regards
    R. Vadivelan

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia USA
    Posts
    2,763
    Provided Answers: 19
    If I remember correctly, all you have to do to return a runtime version of a file to its original version is to manually change the r to the file's original last letter. So change

    mydb.mdr

    to

    mydb.mdb

    or

    mydb.accdr

    to

    mydb.accdb

    Of course, if the original file was an mde or accde you're still out of luck!

    Linq ;0)>
    Hope this helps!

    The problem with making anything foolproof...is that fools are so darn ingenious!

    All posts/responses based on Access 2003/2007

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    163
    Sorry Missinglinq for the late reply. Unfortunately the above method does not works. I got the backup file also but still I could not edit the forms or modules etc., I think the original file itself was .mde format.
    Thanks and Regards
    R. Vadivelan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia USA
    Posts
    2,763
    Provided Answers: 19
    Well, as I said before

    Quote Originally Posted by Missinglinq View Post

    ...if the original file was an mde or accde you're still out of luck...
    Sorry!

    Linq ;0)>
    Hope this helps!

    The problem with making anything foolproof...is that fools are so darn ingenious!

    All posts/responses based on Access 2003/2007

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    163
    Dear Missinglinq,

    Finally I had search in my fried system and got the .mdb file. I can open the file, but still I could not edit the forms or modules. Could you please help me on this how to edit the form or modules.
    Thanks and Regards
    R. Vadivelan

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia USA
    Posts
    2,763
    Provided Answers: 19
    Quote Originally Posted by velu130486 View Post

    ...I...got the .mdb file. I can open the file, but still I could not edit the forms or modules.
    I'm assuming that this is because you're trying to do it running only Access Runtime, and in order to make modifications, like this, you're going to have to run it under a full version of Access.

    Linq ;0)>
    Hope this helps!

    The problem with making anything foolproof...is that fools are so darn ingenious!

    All posts/responses based on Access 2003/2007

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    163
    Dear Missinglinq,

    Could you please elaborate the steps how to run the file in full version of Access.
    Thanks and Regards
    R. Vadivelan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia USA
    Posts
    2,763
    Provided Answers: 19
    You have to have a full version of Access installed on your computer, then, in Windows Explorer, simply click on the mdb file that you found. It should then open and you can make your needed modifications.

    Linq ;0)>
    Hope this helps!

    The problem with making anything foolproof...is that fools are so darn ingenious!

    All posts/responses based on Access 2003/2007

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