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  1. #1
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    Oct 2014
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    Celko's Advanced Programming for Smarties

    While I may not be a smarty I am interested in getting better at SQL. It's impossible to avoid the use in my role so I was wondering what people thought about this book?

    I am looking at getting better at writing more complex SQL such as aggregates and the use of sub queries and windowing etc.

    I use all these now but I want to improve these skills.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
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    There are lots of ways to learn SQL. I love books, and will never argue that you shouldn't buy a book. With that said, I think that there is a better option for the needs that you've demonstrated in your posts/questions.

    A "big ticket" answer that I see as the best "bang for the buck" is PluralSight. The basic version is $299/year and the Plus version is $499/year. This investment gets you well over 1000 hours of the best training I've ever seen from an online provider, and access to one of the most talented and supportive online IT communities in the world. The courses offered cover everything from SQL Server, to how to do presentations, to Linux, and beyond. The free trial is 30 days worth, and it will leave you reeling if you get even a small fraction of the value that PluralSight offers!

    Joe Celko is an old friend of mine. We argue like cats and dogs and sometimes have security eyeing us nervously, then we go have a beer! Very few people have ever been able to argue him to a stand-still, and I'm the only person I've ever heard of that has gotten Joe to change his mind. His academic credentials are impeccable. He's a master, with an amazing history and almost endless experience. He actually sat on the ANSI committee that wrote the standard for what SQL ought to do, and he's very good at explaining what SQL should do. As you've probably guessed, I'm somewhat biased in favor of Joe in spite of his shortcomings (which I acknowledge and am willing to accept).

    Celko's SQL For Smarties is a "must read" in my opinion, but probably not until you've used SQL for at least 500 hours. If you intend to make SQL a long term commitment, I'd also strongly recommend Joe Celko's Thinking in Sets: Auxiliary, Temporal, and Virtual Tables in SQL and/or Joe Celko's Complete Guide to NoSQL to get a handle on non-relational ways to deal with data.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  3. #3
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    Oct 2014
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    Thanks Pat I appreciate your time to reply to this post. The Thinking in Sets book looks like a great start.

  4. #4
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    Thinking in Sets is definitely a great book, but I'm not sure that I'd describe it as a "great start" unless you've got a PHD! It really pushes RA (Relational Algebra) pretty hard, and will probably be a daunting task for anyone with less than 1000 working hours with a relational database.

    Please take a second look at PluralSight. They really are one of the best investments in technology education that I have seen, I can't recommend them highly enough. The free trial makes them almost a "no brainer" for anyone in the technology field.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  5. #5
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    Oct 2014
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    268
    The University I attended / graduated from gives me free access to Lynda.com and there are some free SQL training out there. I took a couple of VBA courses from Curtis Frye on there which were helpful I see there is a SSRS and SSIS course out there as well.

    Do you recommend any specific courses to get moving in the right direction? I'm looking to get better at writing queries and moving onto creating objects such as triggers. We have a need to build those on tables to show updates and I really want to learn how to do those.

    Again thanks a lot I appreciate it!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Once again I have to throw Rudy's book Simply SQL in to the ring.

    It's an easy read and not too daunting technically. Perfectly poised for someone at the beginning of their SQL journey.

    Whilst my library at home has a good selection of other SQL books (including a couple by Celko), this is always the one I loan to people to get them started, and the feedback from them has always been good*


    * not just verbally either... trust me, I review their code
    George
    Home | Blog

  7. #7
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    Oct 2014
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    Right now my Library consist of Database Processing (From School), MS SQL 70-461 Study Guide and Microsoft SQL Server 2012 T-SQL Fundamentals. Thanks George for the follow up as well.
    Last edited by VLOOKUP; 12-31-14 at 12:22.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    268
    Thanks all I wanted to follow up however.

    Maybe this direct approach would help spell out my requirements.

    Learn how to aggregate data better
    Learn how to create sets of data and then better use them to get my intended results (such as temp tables)
    Data Warehousing in general, I came from a transaction environment now I am working in a data warehouse. All the dimensions running into the facts table is a lot different than the transactional design.
    Learning intermediate to advance program techniques.

    I feel like others are superior and I just want to fight through that and get better. I have a lab at home with a local copy of SQL server 2012 and I work on 2008 at work. I have the means and the job to get better I just want to get better.

    I think the beginner book is cool I have a few of them already I just want to start to see improvement more so. Don't get me wrong I am picking up little things like casting in the select and trying different methods.

  9. #9
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    Nail the foundations first - don't skip straight to the fine details that affect your job [currently].

    I've worked with people who have done this in other technologies and they excel in the stuff they do every day but if you ask them to deviate even slightly they often falter at the first hurdle.

    A good grounding will do you better in the long run.
    George
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