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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
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    Unanswered: Inner Join between 2 queries through query designer

    Hi, I have recently started working on Sql server management studio. I have been using MS access in the past. To link results of 2 queries in MS access I would open the query wizard and it would show me the list of saved queries and then I could join them as regular tables. Im trying to look for this option in management studio. When I open query designer in management studio I am only given the option to add existing tables, how can I add existing queries? Thanks!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    on the wrong server
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    Provided Answers: 6
    Make your queries into Views in SQL Server and then I think you will be able to access them from the existing tables screen. However it has been years since I used Access for anything beyond the quick and dirty, so I could be wrong.
    If one brings so much courage to this world the world has to kill them or break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry. Earnest Hemingway, A Farewell To Arms.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Provided Answers: 54
    Queries are really artifacts of the Microsoft Access User Interface, they really aren't part of the database itself.

    You have two basic options:
    1. Save one "query" as a View in the database
    2. Combine the syntax generated (as SELECT statements) using a JOIN predicate

    Microsoft Access is designed for the person working on their desktop with the application. It trades relational correctness and application scalability to make the design process easier for the user/developer. That's why SQL Server can support so many more users than Microsoft Access can.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

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