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  1. #1
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    Answered: Scripting Languages for SSMS

    I was wondering if there was a strong need to learn scripting languages to elevate your level of skill, in regards to database development.

    Would Python or Powershell be good to pick up to handle tasks in and outside of the RDMBS?

    Thoughts?

  2. Best Answer
    Posted by MCrowley

    "If you are a full on developer using only SQL Server, I would say start learning a .NET variant (C#, VB.NET). Seeing what the database looks like from the application side may give you some interesting insights.

    If you are using Oracle, or MySQL, then Python, PERL, or Java would be good choices."


  3. #2
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    If you are a full on developer using only SQL Server, I would say start learning a .NET variant (C#, VB.NET). Seeing what the database looks like from the application side may give you some interesting insights.

    If you are using Oracle, or MySQL, then Python, PERL, or Java would be good choices.

  4. #3
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    I would emphatically say "Yes" to learning at least basic scripting skills, and would encourage you to learn more than the basics if you can. Even if scripting does nothing else, it will help you to understand the basic processes and therefor the needs of developers and applications and that understanding is crucial to knowing how you can best help them.

    If you intend to develop full fledged applications (thick, thin, or web are the same for these purposes), then you have a whole different class of languages, choices, etc. The following discussion is targeted toward scripting.

    If you scripts will run in a Windows environment, I'd suggest that you focus on PowerShell. It is the scripting language of choice, and Microsoft is putting the weight of the entire company behind PowerShell. That makes PowerShell the truly "must know" scripting language no matter what you want to accomplish on the Windows platform.

    If you are running on other platforms, the choice of scripting language isn't as clear.

    Python is a strong choice for many reasons. Python is a great stand alone scripting language, so it can do simple automation tasks on many platforms. Python is a great tool for building web apps. Python is also used extensively in the Big Data arena, alongside or sometimes even in place of R.

    Perl is a venerable choice, and it is still my favorite scripting language. Perl offers enormous power and wonderful simplicity, and if used judiciously it can do things in enormously powerful and wonderfully simple ways which is a feat that very few other languages can achieve!

    One interesting wrinkle that might entertain you is Pash, which is an Open Source Mono-based implementation of PowerShell. PowerShell inherits much of its power from the CIM/WMI/AD interfaces that are provided in the Windows environment and these are for the most part absent from Pash. Otherwise Pash is a pretty complete PowerShell implementation as it stands now, and if Microsoft puts much effort into expanding the language with a few providers to allow it to access non-Windows environments then Pash could very quickly become the language of choice (benefiting Pash, PowerShell, and Microsoft in the process).

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  5. #4
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    Thanks for the follow up. I am downloading Visual Studio 2015 Express right now. I have been coding VBA for several years, so I decided to try going through some of the modules for VB.NET.

    Thoughts on using VB.NET?

  6. #5
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    Pat just saw your post....

    I have PowerShell installed on my machine right now, only having scripted very easy type task, such as counting certain files in a network share etc. This is more for metrics etc, data clean up efforts.

  7. #6
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    VB.Net is a great tool, but I prefer C# and based on the examples posted on blogs, at conferences, etc. so does Microsoft. The syntactic differences are subtle, but important and the runtime environments are identical.

    PowerShell is both quicker to learn and it can be put to real world use a lot more easily than C# or VB.

    I wouldn't stand in the way of you learning anything that interests you, so please don't construe my comments as directing you away from anything. If I didn't have so many responsibilities, I could very comfortably become a full time student for the remainder of my life! I just see PowerShell as returning a lot more value for the time spent learning it for your particular case.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

  8. #7
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    You mean for more of a development business / data role?

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by VLOOKUP View Post
    You mean for more of a development business / data role?
    Depending on what you're asking, probably!

    I'm not clear what you're asking, so I can't answer clearly.

    -PatP
    In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, theory and practice are unrelated.

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