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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    2

    Unanswered: Question about standing up my first reporting database

    Hello,

    I have just been propositioned to assist in creating a simple database for a drug treatment center. The data requirements do not seem very robust and there will not be anything special needed other than reporting out of the database (No data manipulation etc.). Things like doctor's notes on patients within a range of dates, patient ID's with diagnoses, date admitted, date exited, and things of that nature.

    My question is: Does this just seem easy? I've taken classes on database design and created a working example in Oracle, am working my way through a data warehousing specialization, and really feel that I am up to the task. I just want someone who is experienced to either confirm that it isn't that big of an undertaking if I have a working knowledge of relational database technology, or slap some sense into me letting me know that there are tons of things I have not considered.

    I have not had a meeting to outline the exact data requirements, made the ERDs, mapped the relationships etc. but I do know that concurrency control will be their main concern as at least 5 doctors could be updating rows at any given time in the DB. This is my first post so I apologize if I have broken any of the rules, but I truly am interested to get some perspective on this.

    TLDR: Making a simple reporting database for an addiction treatment center. Is it too hard for a rookie? why? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    10
    What I would do first before trying to create a schema is to sit down with somebody and see how their current reporting methods are. This will give you a better idea of what data they're trying to collect. But in terms of difficulty, that depends on how much data and how many tables you're going to import.

    Since you're coming from an Oracle background, you'll also have to familiarize yourself with T-SQL. The nice thing with SQL Server is that it comes with SSRS, so making reports with it isn't too difficult. When I had my internship, the company had an Oracle database and for some reason didn't use APEX, so I had to write reports with HTP.P statements. Yuck!

    At my current workplace, we have two SQL Server instances for the one project I manage. One hosts the data that the application uses and it replicates it over to another instance, which we use to pull reports from. This way, you're not touching the live data directly, but you can still get updates.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by swirling_vortex View Post
    What I would do first before trying to create a schema is to sit down with somebody and see how their current reporting methods are. This will give you a better idea of what data they're trying to collect. But in terms of difficulty, that depends on how much data and how many tables you're going to import.

    Since you're coming from an Oracle background, you'll also have to familiarize yourself with T-SQL. The nice thing with SQL Server is that it comes with SSRS, so making reports with it isn't too difficult. When I had my internship, the company had an Oracle database and for some reason didn't use APEX, so I had to write reports with HTP.P statements. Yuck!

    At my current workplace, we have two SQL Server instances for the one project I manage. One hosts the data that the application uses and it replicates it over to another instance, which we use to pull reports from. This way, you're not touching the live data directly, but you can still get updates.
    Thanks for the reply man. We are going to have a sit down where we outline all the data and reporting requirements as well as how many concurrent users will be accessing it, how they will access it etc. Do you think this is something that is possible for someone with minimal experience? I am excited about the prospect but don't want to bite off more than I can chew. I will update this thread when I know more so you may have a better idea of what I would be working with. Thanks again.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,425
    Provided Answers: 4
    Are there 5 doctors in the addiction treatment centre or five concurrent users of the database? 5 users is nothing for today's databases.
    All projects starts like this: "we only want some very simple things". In time they will need more reports and more complex reports. This may be a great learning experience for you.

    Do request that someone experienced coaches you during the first (half?) year, like two half days per week or so.
    With kind regards . . . . . SQL Server 2000/2005/2012
    Wim

    Grabel's Law: 2 is not equal to 3 -- not even for very large values of 2.
    Pat Phelan's Law: 2 very definitely CAN equal 3 -- in at least two programming languages

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    268
    Provided Answers: 6
    Reporting Result Table

    Report Result Key (PK), Reporting ID (FK), Reporting Goal, Reporting Actual, Reporting Month

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Reporting Name Table

    Reporting ID PK, Reporting Name, Comments, Department, Owner, Status, ETC...........


    This way the KPI information goes vertical not horizontal.

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