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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    6

    Unanswered: oracle + access frontend

    are the linked tables "enough" for communicating with oracle or do i need additional ADO commands. is there a possible solution just with ADO? and if i just use ADO (if it's possible) how do i create views ...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    16
    why don't you use Oracle DBA Studio or Oracle Shema Manager for your Oracle database? much better than access!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    6
    well, i think almost everything is better than ACCESS (ok maybe lotus notes is the worst). but my task is to manipulate the oracle tables over an odbc connection with ACCESS. doing it with java would have been my favourite solution. but now i have to figure out the ACCESS object model and the ADO semantics.
    anyway, an answer to my initial question would be appretiated.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    3
    after you open an access database, you can import outsource data from ODBC driver (you have to set up your oracle ODBC driver). then, you can copy Oracle database tables from Oracle to your Local Access database. I don't think you can modify data through Access frontend.

    We do have some user - they know Access very well but they know nothing about Oracle. They need run some reports. We set up ODBC for them, ask them copy tables to their Access database, and they are very happy to run their report in this way.

    Snow

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    NC, USA
    Posts
    200
    John307RnR,

    You will have no problem using Access as a frontend (for the most part).

    Here are are a few gotchas I know about:
    1. If you need to edit data, you must specify a combination of columns that define the record as unique. This is done during the linking. Access will prompt you. You don't actually have to have a unique key on the underlying table for this. You can even specify that all columns be used.
    2. Bitmap indexes on tables may cause problems with some older ODBC drivers.
    3. If you are creating columns and/or tables within Access for export to Oracle, make sure you use all uppercase for object and column names. It will save you a lot of headaches... trust me!

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