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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Unanswered: Query Analyzer Memorie Leaks

    I am dealing with a network addmin that has no idea about
    SQL server, query analyzer or the relationship that they
    have with eachother. He is trying to tell me that because
    I am keeping my query analyzer window open with an open
    connection that I am causing a memeorie leak. I know
    Microsoft would not give an admin a tool that causes
    problems like that. He is tring to tell me that I have to
    run everything from the server and or close all windows
    upon completion.....wich I know not only from my mcps in
    sql server admin and design that that is crap but also by
    using common sence that that is crazy. This addmin is
    also a loaly folower of Microsoft...If Microsoft says it
    then its better than the Bible to him...I need a Microsoft
    document, be it a help file or a technet file that
    dispruves him so that he will go look at my server and
    find the real problem.....I hate this bs where I have to
    prove its not SQL before he will look for the hardware
    problem.... Any help would be greatly apreciated.
    Regards Jim
    .
    Last edited by JDionne; 01-21-03 at 13:29.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    369

    Re: Query Analyzer Memorie Leaks

    RE:
    Q1 He is trying to tell me that because I am keeping my query analyzer window open {on a workstation} with an open connection that I am causing a memory leak.
    A1 Leaks occurring in relation to connections are by no means unheard of. For example:

    a Memory Leaks with Desktop Database Drivers:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default...;en-us;q132493

    b 7.0 pre - sp2 DB-Library IP Connection Memory Leak:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default...;en-us;q236439

    That said, It is unlikely that a query analyzer window open {on a workstation} with an open connection is causing a memory leak (in the absence of any other factors).

    RE:
    Q2 I know Microsoft would not give an admin a tool that causes
    problems like that.
    Q3 He is trying to tell me that I have to run everything from the server Q4 and or close all windows upon completion.....which I know not only from my mcps in sql server admin and design that that is crap but also by using common sense that, that is crazy.
    A2 Given such a probable scenario, MS Would most likely have documented such an issue and / or corrected or documented work around procedures long ago.

    A3 Unless the environment is rather unusual, (or this is a terminal server environment), running "everything" (???!?), from a server would in all likelyhood be a "bad idea" (innumerable reasons). That said, there are circumstances when there may be significant benefits associated with running certain kinds of procedures / scripts at the console (ts admin and / or physically); for example, restores.

    A4 If "close all windows upon completion" = "quit user applications when not in use"; then, as a practice that is not "a bad thing", per se. In particular, if a given user application is known to have a memory leak in some component, quitting the user application when not in use may well help prevent the flawed (leaky) application from causing issues / problems.

    RE:
    Q4 This addmin is also a loyal follower of Microsoft...If Microsoft says it
    then its better than the Bible to him...I need a Microsoft document, be it a help file or a technet file that disproves him so that he will go look at my server and find the real problem.....I hate this bs where I have to
    prove its not SQL before he will look for the hardware
    problem.... Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Regards Jim.
    A4 Hopefully something here will be of help. {If there were a known, specifically applicable issue, it would no doubt be documented (as in the kb links given in A2).}

    As to links to other potentially helpful MS documents, one might begin at:
    http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinfo/default.asp

  3. #3
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    I totaly apreciate your reply. You have prooven what I knew, now I get to go to my network admin and tell him to rotate. Thanx
    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Houston, TX
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    Another approach is to ask this guy to help you understand why he thinks a memory leak is occuring. Step through a benchmark where you have no connection, make a connection, issue a select, and finally disconnect. I suspect he just doesn't understand how SQL server consumes memory.

    Another approach would be to explain the SQL server is running under a service, starting a second app on the same server to make a connection to SQL server or starting an app on a diffrent machine and connecting to SQL server is irrelivant to SQL server. If one causes SQL server to have a memory leak then the other one will to.

    I feel for you as I have been in this situation before. I had the lattitude to force the admin to prove his point to his boss and my boss.
    Paul Young
    (Knowledge is power! Get some!)

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Charlotte NC
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    Originally posted by Paul Young
    Another approach is to ask this guy to help you understand why he thinks a memory leak is occuring. Step through a benchmark where you have no connection, make a connection, issue a select, and finally disconnect. I suspect he just doesn't understand how SQL server consumes memory.

    Another approach would be to explain the SQL server is running under a service, starting a second app on the same server to make a connection to SQL server or starting an app on a diffrent machine and connecting to SQL server is irrelivant to SQL server. If one causes SQL server to have a memory leak then the other one will to.

    I feel for you as I have been in this situation before. I had the lattitude to force the admin to prove his point to his boss and my boss.
    You seem to be a well informed individual
    I do apreciate all the help
    Jim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    369

    On Memory Leaks:

    RE:
    I totaly apreciate your reply. You have prooven what I knew, now I get to go to my network admin and tell him to rotate. Thanx Jim
    You are welcome.

    I'm not sure I would be as harsh as to "tell him to rotate"; memory leaks can be devilishly difficult to nail down. A typical initially reported user symptom that often serves as a "telltale" clue is that a (workstation or server) will perform more and more slowly as time passes, and when the system is rebooted, normal (responsive) performance returns.

    With user workstations, a common admin approach is to have the user (or a tech depending on knowledge / skill, account rights, etc.) launch Task Manager (showing all processes), and record how much memory is used by the top five to ten processes when the workstation begins to get "bogged down" (clicking the headings sorts the data).

    After a few incidents, one or more processes common to each incident often stand out as "likely suspects" to investigate further. On servers under suspicion of harboring leaky applications, one may perform a similar checkup, (recording all running process weekly or as frequently as necessary), to identify processes that are likely memory leak candidates. This once helped to identify a tooltray RAID utility app (with a very slow leak) on a server that was always logged on at the console.

    {Just a thought: Perhaps this has something to do with the admin's point of view; if one were "completly unfamiliar" with Sql Server most any production sql service process would almost immediatly fit such a "likely suspect" profile of a leaky memory application.}

    Continous monitoring of Memory counters using Performance Monitor is another approach. It is usually more effective to pick some likely candidates first and monitor them.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Charlotte NC
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    665

    Re: On Memory Leaks:

    Originally posted by DBA
    You are welcome.

    I'm not sure I would be as harsh as to "tell him to rotate"; memory leaks can be devilishly difficult to nail down. A typical initially reported user symptom that often serves as a "telltale" clue is that a (workstation or server) will perform more and more slowly as time passes, and when the system is rebooted, normal (responsive) performance returns.

    With user workstations, a common admin approach is to have the user (or a tech depending on knowledge / skill, account rights, etc.) launch Task Manager (showing all processes), and record how much memory is used by the top five to ten processes when the workstation begins to get "bogged down" (clicking the headings sorts the data).

    After a few incidents, one or more processes common to each incident often stand out as "likely suspects" to investigate further. On servers under suspicion of harboring leaky applications, one may perform a similar checkup, (recording all running process weekly or as frequently as necessary), to identify processes that are likely memory leak candidates. This once helped to identify a tooltray RAID utility app (with a very slow leak) on a server that was always logged on at the console.

    {Just a thought: Perhaps this has something to do with the admin's point of view; if one were "completly unfamiliar" with Sql Server most any production sql service process would almost immediatly fit such a "likely suspect" profile of a leaky memory application.}

    Continous monitoring of Memory counters using Performance Monitor is another approach. It is usually more effective to pick some likely candidates first and monitor them.

    You are correct on all counts, but this addmin just picked an app, query analyzer, told me it was my fault and basicaly called me an idiot. He did no testing, and has no knowlage. But for me to get anything done I have to PROVE HIM WRONG, a man that knows absolutly nothing. I cant get him to work on my server untill I prove to him that its not sql thats causing the problem...every time I have a hardware problem I have to spend two weeks proving to him hes an idiot. Its sooooooooo upseting. Im always right...maybe he should get a clue

    PS I have no other apps running on the server and query analyzer runs on my desktop. Im sorry to vent here but I have to somewere
    Thanx again for all of your insight. It has proven to be invaluble.
    Regards
    Jim

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