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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    51

    Help - Dynamic Disc Woes - Win2k :(

    Hi everyone, im having some severe problems, hoping some of you guys/ladies
    can help me out. Im using Win2k Server, SP3.

    To cut a long story short, I have 3 hard drives connected to Promise EIDE
    controller. On Thursday all the drives vanished, hmmmm... very strange
    (worked perfectly for over a year), I opened the system, played with the
    cables, nothing.

    So, I bought a new EIDE controller, tried it, nothing. Put the old
    controller back in, and the drives have somehow appeared into Disk
    Management, however if I try and re-activate them i get the error:

    'INTERNAL Error - Disk Group has no valid configuration copies'

    I looked over http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=294244 and it suggests a
    re-booting the system, again, no luck. After a search of news, I see a
    program called RepoMan is recommended: http://www.diydatarecovery.nl/

    However, im unsure is it will help me as i have a strange disc config,

    disc #1 and disk #2 are connected as a spanned volume (200gb total).
    disc #3 is split into 4 partitions (40gb total).

    In total, there is 240gb worth of data that i really cant loose, I must get
    it back. Please help.

    Thanks all.
    Taz

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    1

    Re: Help - Dynamic Disc Woes - Win2k :(

    same problem, and is is a big pain...

    i have a 120gig that needs recovering, but i too have NOOOOOOO idea ...

    i tried putting it in another box and it still gives the same error when trying to import the new drive....

    if you find a solution, hit me back....in the meantime, ima look for some software that might do SOMETHING.......grrrrr

    tripl333

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    51
    Hiya, luckyly i did manage to find a solution.

    MS have a until to restore the new MBR style partition it places at the end of the drive, called dmpss.exe, its $100 however i managed to blag it for free If you need it I can mail it to you, i however coule not get it to work

    However, i did find an app called r-studio which re-constructed the drive and let me copy across all my data, if that isnt an option, let me know and i'll send you the file, regards

    Taz

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1
    did you get your data back online, i have a 80g "data" drive that i tried to import after i formatted and reinstalled XP on the 40g o/s app drive. please let me know what worked, thanks.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Des Moines, Iowa
    Posts
    4
    Ok I am having a similar situation let me explain my setup first off.

    I have 2 30gig drives (one is my main os drive and the second is a slave off that drive) which are plugged into the primary IDE port on the mobo. I also have 2 120gig drives. Each is set as a single drive plugged into a IDE Controller card.

    Everything was fine until I had to move the IDE controller card to a different PCI slot. Now I have the problem where the slaved 30gig and the second 120gig are not showing in Win2K and when I try to import the drives in Disk Management I get the error that says "INTERNAL Error: Disk has no valid configuration copies."

    I've searched all over the net for solutions and haven't found much. I came across this post and wondered if anyone had a solid solution and if so could they share it with me. I am not the stupid computer user but some of the stuff I've seen related to this problem is a little foreign to me. If someone could either reply here or message me on AIM (HSDHollywood) or email me (hmartin@mchsi.com) it would be greatly appreciated. I really need to recover this data as it is customer information that I use for my web design business I do on the side. Thanks in advance for any help you all may provide.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    51
    Hi,

    1) Do you have a spare computer u can hook the drives upto
    2) Do you have some spare HD space you can copy the data to.

    If so, i can help you. If not, i can give you the email microsoft sent me (which I couldnt use, but worth a try).

    Taz

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Des Moines, Iowa
    Posts
    4
    Yes I have one of the 120s are still being picked up in Windows so I got space to put data on. I don't have another Win2K Machine unfortunately or any other machine for that matter. I do have a friend at work who is running XP Pro and said he'd be willing to try putting my drives in importing them to see if that works. Why do you ask these two question? Thanks for replying btw.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1

    Exclamation

    Hi,
    I have the same problem. I get the "INTERNAL Error: Disk has no valid configuration copies." error message when trying to reactivating my dynamic offline disks.

    Have also searched for solutions, but haven't found much more than this...

    Please post to this thread if you find a solution on how to recover data from the disks or how to make them online again...

    Best Regards
    /Dan

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    51
    Hi all, damm stupid thing lost my original reply, so here goes again.

    1) Sorry for not getting back to many of the guys who emailed me for help
    2) I've attached the MS utility to this post along with the help documentation they sent me
    3) I see no problem attaching the file/help as it was sent to me free of charge by microsoft.

    So. here goes

    Hi Taz,

    The following example is a sample output from the Dmpss
    utility that displays the syntax for each command:

    dmpss - Logical
    Disk Manager Recovery Tool
    Usage:

    dmpss dumpconfig
    <source disk number>? <target
    file>
    dmpss restoreconfig <source
    file>? <target disk number>
    dmpss
    copyconfig <source disk number>? <target
    disk number>? <target diskid>
    dmpss
    repairconfig <target disk number>
    dmpss getheader
    <source disk number>
    dmpss initheader
    <target disk number> [/restore]
    dmpss
    changeheader <target disk number>?
    <attribute1>=<value1> <attribute2>=<value2> ...


    diskid = guid
    hostid = guid
    dgid = guid
    dgname = string
    bootsig = unsigned decimal
    disksetid = guid
    newdisksetid = guid
    puboffset = unsigned decimal
    publen = unsigned decimal
    toc = unsigned decimal
    alttoc = unsigned decimal


    dmpss zapconfig <target disk number>
    (This is a hidden command.)

    The definitions for each command
    are:

    The dmpss dumpconfig command: This command can read the 1 megabyte (MB) (2,048
    sectors) Logical Disk Manager database from the end of
    the source disk and save
    it to a file. For example, dmpss dumpconfig 2
    c:\ldm2.dsk.

    The dmpss restoreconfig command: This command can restore a previously saved Logical Disk
    Manager database from a source Logical Disk Manager database file and restore
    it to the end of the target disk. This command can overwrite the existing
    Logical Disk Manager database. For example, dmpss restoreconfig c:\ldm2.dsk 2.

    The dmpss copyconfig command: This command can copy the 1 MB (2,048
    sectors) Logical
    Disk Manager database from a healthy dynamic disk to a target dynamic disk that
    displays a "missing" message or that you are
    attempting to repair. This command
    requires the correct "diskid:<guid>" that had been
    originally assigned to the target disk. For example,
    dmpss copyconfig 1 2 45260b21-e0e7-4bd6-b817-2e75b94de9b6.

    This information can be extracted from the DMDiag tool
    report under the following two sections:


    The "LDM Disk Config Hard disk#" section as noted below - search for the word Detached.


    ---------- LDM Disk Config Hard diskx ----------
    ...
    ..
    .

    #Record 3: type=0x0034 flags=0x0000 gen_flags=0x0004 size=120
    #Blocks: 7 8
    Disk: Disk2 rid=0.1027 updated=0.1061
    assoc: diskid=45260b21-e0e7-4bd6-b817-2e75b94de9b6 detached

    lastdevice=SCSI\DISK&VEN_SEAGATE&PROD_ST19171W&REV _0024\4&1079D045&0&050
    flags:




    The "DMAdmin Verbose Query" section. A device is not associated with this missing disk:

    ---------- DMAdmin Verbose Query ----------
    ...
    ..
    .

    Disk: Disk2
    info: diskid=45260b21-e0e7-4bd6-b817-2e75b94de9b6
    assoc: nodevice (last diskset:
    00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000)


    The Dmpss repairconfig command: This command is used to repair a LDM data that shows
    "Invalid Magic Number" errors:

    ---------- LDM Disk Config Harddisk1 ----------


    #Config copy 01

    ERROR: Error (File block 47): Invalid magic number in the
    configuration copy
    #Header nblocks=5924 blksize=128 hdrsize=512
    #flags=0x0100 (CLEAN)

    This command only addresses the situation when there are corrupted
    blocks in the configuration copy. It does not fix disk header, table of
    contents, or config copy header corruptions. There is nothing we can do if the
    corrupted blocks contained some real volume records.
    These records may be
    deleted when you use this command.

    The dmpss getheader command: This command can read the Logical Disk Manager header
    from the source disk and display the header
    information. There are three copies
    of the header. Two copies are located in the Logical
    Disk Manager database
    itself. The first copy is located in the last sector
    of the physical disk, and
    the second copy is located at the last sector of the physical disk minus 191
    sectors. The third (tertiary) header is in sector 6 of
    the physical disk and is
    used when you extend hardware raid arrays so that you
    can move the Logical Disk
    Manager database. This command can only attempt to
    read the first two headers
    that are located in the Logical Disk Manager database.
    For example, dmpss getheader 2.


    Header
    ======
    diskid: 45260b21-e0e7-4bd6-b817-2e75b94de9b6
    group: name=Ftclass2Dg0
    id=fa248f78-b5de-4102-856f-a2153ad10e96
    flags: private autoimport
    import: bootsig=836838673 hostid=1b77da20-c717-11d0-a5be-00a0c91db73c
    diskset: id=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
    version: 2.11
    iosize: 512
    public: slice=0 offset=63 len=17767827
    private: slice=0 offset=17781064 len=2048
    update: seqno=0.5 time=-273336016
    headers: 2047 1856
    configs: count=1 len=1481
    logs: count=1 len=224
    tocs: 1 2046


    If the header is corrupt, or it does not exist, for example, on a
    basic disk, the dmpss getheader command can return the following error message:



    dmpss getheader 2
    Error: Invalid disk header: A
    format error has been found in the private
    region of the disk.

    The dmpss initheader [/restore] command: This command can re-initialize a generic header on the
    target disk. The command can only initialize the two headers in the Logical
    Disk Manager database, not the tertiary backup header.
    The DMDiag tool cannot
    extract information from the Logical Disk Manager
    database without a proper
    header. If the header that is created is not a
    complete accurate header, you
    must use the changeheader command to modify the fields
    that are incorrect. For example, dmpss initheader 2.

    NOTE: The /restore switch is an optional switch that is used to copy the tertiary
    Logical Disk Manager header (located in sector 6 of
    the target disk) onto the
    primary and secondary Logical Disk Manager headers.
    The /restore switch must not be used unless Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 or the
    hotfix from the following article (Q294244) had been previously applied before
    a problem occurred.

    For
    additional information, click the article
    number below to view the article in
    the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    KBLink:294244.KB.EN-US: Extending Hardware Raid Array May Cause Dynamic
    Unreadable/Offline Error


    Header
    ======
    diskid: 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
    group: name=Bogus id=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
    flags: private autoimport invalid-primary invalid-alt
    import: bootsig=0 hostid=1b77da20-c717-11d0-a5be-00a0c91db73c
    diskset: id=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
    version: 2.11
    iosize: 512
    public: slice=0 offset=63 len=17767827
    private: slice=0 offset=17781064 len=2048
    update: seqno=0.31 time=-849813984
    headers: 2047 1856
    configs: count=1 len=1481
    logs: count=1 len=224
    tocs: 1 2046
    Attached Files Attached Files

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    51
    If the target disk is basic, or it contains an unknown partition
    table entry, when you attempt to initialize a new
    header, you can receive the
    following error message:


    dmpss initheader 0
    Error:
    Basic or unknown partitions were detected on
    the target disk.

    The dmpss changeheader command: This command is used to modify a newly initialized
    header after you have run the initheader command, or
    you want to modify the existing header attributes to
    make repairs. To make effective repairs, you must
    first run the dmdiag.exe -v command to extract vital information from the Logical Disk
    Manager database.

    The following list has header attribute names and
    their descriptions.

    NOTE: The header attributes that have an asterisk (*) are required to
    be modified after you run an initheader command before
    the dynamic disk can be recognized.


    - * diskid: Is the globally unique identifier (GUID) of that physical
    disk that is extracted under the "DMAdmin Verbose Query" section of the
    DMDiag tool report. Every physical disk contains a unique GUID.

    - hostid: Is not applicable for Windows 2000. Hostid is a value that is
    used only on UNIX-based computers. On Windows-based computers, this
    value always has the same fixed value.

    - * dgid: Is the disk group-ID GUID that is extracted under
    the "LDM Disk Config Hard disk X"
    section of the DMDiag tool report. This
    header attribute is also stored in the
    registry under the following key in a
    value called ID:REG_SZ:<Guid>:


    HKEY_lOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\Dmio\BootInfo\Prima
    ryDiskGroup

    - * dgname: Is the name of the disk group. This header
    attribute is usually the computer name
    that is attached with DG0 (IE:
    Ftclass2Dg0) that is extracted from the
    Group record that is under the "LDM
    Disk Config Hard disk X" section of the
    DMDiag tool report. This header
    attribute is also stored in the registry
    under the following key in a value
    called NAME:REG_SZ:<dg_name>:


    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\Dmio\BootInfo\Prima
    ryDiskGroup

    - * bootsig: This value is the disk signature of the boot disk that
    contains the Windows operating system files (%Systemroot%) converted to
    decimal. As displayed on the DMDiag tool report, disk-0 disk signature

    = 31e12511 hex that makes bootsig=836838673.

    - * disksetid: By default, this header attribute is a GUID
    that contains all zeros. When you create
    a disk group, all disks have the same
    disksetid of zero. However, whenever a
    disk is removed from a disk group, the
    remaining disks receive a new disksetid.
    The current disksetid (if non-zero) is
    also stored in the following registry in
    a value called
    DiskSetId:REG_SZ:<Guid>:


    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Servic es\Dmio\BootInfo\Prima
    ryDiskGroup


    An an example, you can have a disk group with 5 disks on
    computer A. Each disk has an identical copy of the
    Logical Disk Manager
    configuration. If you move 2 disks to another
    computer, computer B, and then
    you import them, you can change the configuration (for example, you create a
    new volume). You have 3 disks with the previous configuration copy and 2 disks
    with a new configuration copy. Then, you shut down the computers, move the 2
    disks from computer B back to computer A, and then you restart the computer
    with all 5 disks together again. Logical Disk Manager
    has to decide which
    configuration copy to load for that disk group: The
    one from the 3 disks that
    remained on computer A or the one from the 2 disks
    that moved around. The
    solution is to stamp a GUID called "disksetid" into
    the header of each dynamic
    disk. When Logical Disk Manager is confronted with
    this problem, it reads the
    configuration copy from disks that have the same
    disksetid as the one that had
    been stored in the registry. The other disks are not brought online at all
    because Logical Disk Manager makes the assumption that
    they were reconfigured
    on another computer. Therefore, their previous configurations do not match
    anymore with the data on disk. In this example,
    Logical Disk Manager is going
    to read the configuration from the 3 disks that
    remained on computer A, and
    then Logical Disk Manager is going to mark the other 2 disks as foreign. When
    the disks are imported, they are displayed as offline.



    - newdisksetid: It is only used to specify a new disksetid when it is
    needed.

    - puboffset: It is usually 32 or 63 decimal, based on the drive
    geometry, and it is the starting sector where the first partition can
    start on the disk. However, if there is an OEM Enhanced Industry
    Standard Architecture (EISA) partition at the beginning of the disk,
    puboffset is set at the end of the OEM partition.

    - publen: It is the geometric size of the disk, minus the puboffset
    value, and represents the usable disk space for data volumes. Because
    Logical Disk Manager attempts to hide the last cylinder of the disk,
    after you make repairs, you may have to reduce the publen value,
    especially when you copy a Logical Disk Manager database from different
    size disks by using the copyconfig command. If the last fraction of a
    cylinder is less than 1 MB, the end of the public region is going to be
    less than the geometric size of the disk to accommodate the 1 MB
    private region.

    - toc: It is a pointer to the table of contents of the private region,
    and it must not be altered.

    - alttoc: It is a pointer to the alternate table of contents of the
    private region, and it must not be altered. For example: dmpss
    changeheader 2 bootsig=836838673 dgname=ftclass2Dg0
    dgid=fa248f78-b5de-4102-856f-a2153ad10e96
    diskid=45260b21-e0e7-4bd6-b817-2e75b94de9b6

    - zapconfig. It is a hidden switch that can enable you to completely erase
    the 1 MB (2,048 sectors) Logical Disk
    Manager database at the end of any
    physical disk. This switch can erase the
    last 2,048 sectors irregardless of the
    disk type (for example, basic or
    dynamic). This switch is useful to erase
    unnecessary Logical Disk Manager
    databases from basic disks that had been
    dynamic at one time. (The DMDiag tool
    had to report such unnecessary
    information.)

    For example: dmpss zapconfig 2

    If you use this switch, you may receive the following
    message:


    Warning: Zapconfig is a hidden option. Running
    it may cause
    irreversible damage to your data.
    Are you sure you want to
    erase the Logical Disk
    Manager configuration of disk 2 (Y/N)? If you
    enter "Y", you may receive the following
    message:

    The Logical Disk Manager configuration of disk 2 has been successfully
    erased.




    PICTURE OF DYNAMIC DISK LAYOUT
    ==============================

    sector# (last 2048 sectors)
    0 6 63(puboffset) <LDM Database>

    |---------------------------------------------------------|
    |M H | | H H|
    |B D | USER SPACE FOR VOLUMES | D D|
    |R R | (Publength) | R R|
    | 3 | | 2 1|
    |---------------------------------------------------------|
    ^ ^ ^ ^
    Last Sector is
    |>- Tertiary header points to database-->| | |<-
    Main Header
    |
    |<- 191 Sectors back
    is Backup Header

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Des Moines, Iowa
    Posts
    4
    I meant to reply but have been busy. Thanks etones. You are a lifesaver. Worked great. Got my two drives back. Much thanks.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1

    Etones

    Originally posted by etones
    I have a similar problem as you had before. I had a 80G dynamic hard disk as my secondary drive. I have a 20G hard disk (basic disk) installed with XP. The volumn of the dynamic hard disk disappears while I copying some files from an external hard disk. I reboot the system and found the disk 1 (dyanmic disk) becomes offline. When I try to reactivate it from disk manager. It shows an error in the event log "INTERNAL Error - There are no valid log copies in the disk group (C1000082)."

    I saw your post and download the dmpss.exe and try it. I was able to get the header information of the primary disk ("dmpsss getheader 1"). But I was getting an error when I try "dmpss getheader 0"
    I get the following error

    Error: Invalid disk header:
    A format error was found in the private region of the disk

    I don't know how the disk ID is changed. I tried disk ID greater than 1, it will give me path not found error.

    I have tried to restore the header 0. But I got an XP windows exception and prompt me to send the debug information. I wonder you have any idea of how to bring the dynamic disk online again. Do you have another utility that can help if the dmpsss doesn't work? Thank you in advance.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    New York, NY, USA
    Posts
    3
    HaroldM,

    Could you outline the steps you used to restore your drives? I have an 80GB drive that went offline yesterday and haven't been able to fix. I used the command

    dmpss initheader 2 /restore

    But nothing changed.

    Thanks so much,

    Heather

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Des Moines, Iowa
    Posts
    4
    Honestly I don't remember it was so long ago now. I am really sorry. I just read the documentation that was posted here and I did the copyconfig one or something. Wish I really remembered.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2

    Red face Internal error - Disk group has no valid configuration copies

    So I guess this is a bit late to start this up again but anyway maybe I can get some help here as there isn't alot available from Microsoft's web site and the best reply on google is this. I have a PC running Windows 2000 Server with 5x HDD's. Disk 0 = 80Gig IDE, 1 = 80Gig IDE, 2 = 80Gig IDE, 3 = 20Gig IDE, 4 = 40Gig SCSI. I boot off Disk 4, Disk 0 + 1 are configured as a software mirror, the rest are Simple Volumes. Disk 4 failed in the week. I moved Disk 1 to a Windows XP PC as I have many times before with other Dynamic Disks and got the Internal error - Disk group has no valid configuration copies. I have since installed a new 9Gig SCSI as disk 4 and loaded Windows 2000 Server. Connected all 4 IDE disks and still get the same error. I got the DMPSS file from this post and got all the headers. What do I have to do to get the IDE disks up and running again though? I was thinking of copying the configuration from disk 0 to disk 4 as I can always reload disk 4 if I need. Would realy like some help on this one.

    Thanks

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