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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    4

    Unanswered: Build Expression in VBA

    Hi - using MS Access 2000, I notice I can no longer "build" an expression in a VBA window... I found this to be a very easy way to make reference to a form, reports, etc, in prior version of Access.. Was I the only one using this? Why did MS get rid of the feature in 2000? Or, rather, am I missing something??? Did I simply not install the feature? Is there another, easier way to accomplish what I've described (or do I just bite the bullet and type the whole [forms]![frmTest]!txtWhatever = ... etc. etc. myself)

    Thanks in advance...

    JBR

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Préverenges, Switzerland
    Posts
    3,740
    it works for me in A2K (and it still gets the ].[ bracketing wrong sometimes like it used to in A97)

    - where are you trying to build and not finding a builder?

    izy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Wales
    Posts
    580

    Try this

    Ensure

    Tools > Options > Auto List Members

    Is ticked?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    4
    Originally posted by izyrider
    it works for me in A2K (and it still gets the ].[ bracketing wrong sometimes like it used to in A97)

    - where are you trying to build and not finding a builder?

    izy

    ----
    Odd... I'm in the VBA code window. I can still "build" in a query design, just not from the code window. Must be a setting somewhere???

    Thanks for the response,

    JBR

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    4

    Re: Try this

    Originally posted by garethdart
    Ensure

    Tools > Options > Auto List Members

    Is ticked?

    Yup - it's checked. Problem doesn't seem to be the "Auto List" - this is still occuring - but I can't "right click" and "Build".

    Thanks for the response...

    JBR

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    120

    Re: Build Expression in VBA

    [QUOTE][SIZE=1]Originally posted by Jim Reynolds
    Hi - using MS Access 2000, I notice I can no longer "build" an expression in a VBA window... I found this to be a very easy way to make reference to a form, reports, etc, in prior version of Access.. Was I the only one using this? Why did MS get rid of the feature in 2000? Or, rather, am I missing something??? Did I simply not install the feature? Is there another, easier way to accomplish what I've described (or do I just bite the bullet and type the whole [forms]![frmTest]!txtWhatever = ... etc. etc. myself)

    Thanks in advance...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    120
    I don't know how this happened, but the post above this one was NOT posted by me!!
    Michael

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Préverenges, Switzerland
    Posts
    3,740
    sorry - thought you were talking of the thing you get for queries & expressions etc.
    must learn to read!

    truth is i didn't know there was such a code builder in a95 & a97, so i don't miss it in a2k.

    i see a comment
    Unfortunatley Access 2000 does not include Code Builders and therefore...
    on http://www.colhill.demon.co.uk/index.htm

    izy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    4
    Originally posted by izyrider
    sorry - thought you were talking of the thing you get for queries & expressions etc.
    must learn to read!

    truth is i didn't know there was such a code builder in a95 & a97, so i don't miss it in a2k.

    i see a comment
    Unfortunatley Access 2000 does not include Code Builders and therefore...
    on http://www.colhill.demon.co.uk/index.htm

    izy
    ---
    Yes, it was a really handy feature in 97 (and earlier), so I'm not sure why MS would have removed it from 2000 (unless I was indeed the only one using it?)

    Thanks to all for their responses...

    JBR

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