Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    8

    Question Unanswered: Xeon MP Servers & SQL 2000 License Question

    All,

    Is there anyone out there who has first hand experience in licensing SQL Server 2000 in the per processor model on Intel Hyper Threaded servers? Ignoring the tech differences (HALT, YIELD, ect...) and focussing on the license differences between Windows 2000 and Windows 2003. Lets assume a correct logical processor start sequence in the bios for the processors. Lets also assume we are running windows 2000 advanced server on a 4 processor Xeon MP server. Does this mean that each logical processor will be counted as a physical processor ie the system will act as if there is 8 physical processors? Will the server have to be licensed as a 8 processor server in SQL Server 2000 to use the 8 logical processors even though it technically only has 4 physical processors? From what I can gather this is the case. On the Flip side if I were to setup the same hardware as a Windows 2003 server would I now be able to license SQL Server as an 4 processor server but take advantage of the 8 logical processors? Help...

    Thanks in advance
    Very confused in WI

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    3,662
    If it's hyper-threaded, - you'll need 8-CPU license on your OS for SQL to be able to use all 8 logical CPU's. Remember, SQL sees only what OS lets it see. If your OS is licensed for 4 you can't make SQL see 8 because they ain't there.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Posts
    198

    Re: Xeon MP Servers & SQL 2000 License Question

    Originally posted by Jwadzin
    All,

    Is there anyone out there who has first hand experience in licensing SQL Server 2000 in the per processor model on Intel Hyper Threaded servers? Ignoring the tech differences (HALT, YIELD, ect...) and focussing on the license differences between Windows 2000 and Windows 2003. Lets assume a correct logical processor start sequence in the bios for the processors. Lets also assume we are running windows 2000 advanced server on a 4 processor Xeon MP server. Does this mean that each logical processor will be counted as a physical processor ie the system will act as if there is 8 physical processors? Will the server have to be licensed as a 8 processor server in SQL Server 2000 to use the 8 logical processors even though it technically only has 4 physical processors? From what I can gather this is the case. On the Flip side if I were to setup the same hardware as a Windows 2003 server would I now be able to license SQL Server as an 4 processor server but take advantage of the 8 logical processors? Help...

    Thanks in advance
    Very confused in WI
    I read on the MS Website though that they only are counting physical processors in the licensing count. It is in http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/docs/_Toc6133799

    The catch then becomes version. Per http://www.microsoft.com/sql/evaluat...ew/default.asp
    the enterprise and developer editions support up 32 processors. The standard edition only supports 4.
    Jim P.

    Supoorting Oracle, MSSQL7, Sybase 8, & Pervasive. Confusion Reigns

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    8
    Originally posted by rdjabarov
    If it's hyper-threaded, - you'll need 8-CPU license on your OS for SQL to be able to use all 8 logical CPU's. Remember, SQL sees only what OS lets it see. If your OS is licensed for 4 you can't make SQL see 8 because they ain't there.
    Per the example Windows 2000 Advanced server will see up to 8 processors so the OS would be licensed for 8 CPU's - hence SQL would be able to see 8...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    3,662
    ...which proves the point, - you have to have 8-processor license.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    8
    Originally posted by rdjabarov
    If it's hyper-threaded, - you'll need 8-CPU license on your OS for SQL to be able to use all 8 logical CPU's. Remember, SQL sees only what OS lets it see. If your OS is licensed for 4 you can't make SQL see 8 because they ain't there.
    Per the example Windows 2000 Advanced server will see up to 8 processors so the OS would be licensed for 8 CPU's - hence SQL would be able to see 8...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    8
    Originally posted by rdjabarov
    ...which proves the point, - you have to have 8-processor license.
    Which is what I had thought - the question is how does Windows 2003 in conjuction with SQL Server 2000 handle the license?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Posts
    198
    Originally posted by Jwadzin
    Which is what I had thought - the question is how does Windows 2003 in conjuction with SQL Server 2000 handle the license?
    If your version of W2K3 can see 8 processors then it will use 8. If it is limited to 4 CPU, you will only get 4. Check what Microsoft has to say about your version of 2003 at http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/default.mspx

    Then if your W2K3 can see 8 processors great. Then you look at the version of M$ SQL you have. If that version http://www.microsoft.com/sql/evaluat...ew/default.asp cans ee 8 it will use all 8. If it can see only 2 then it will use 2 regardless of what W2K3 can see.

    But if W2K3 can only see two and SQL can see 8 you are then limited by the W2K3.
    Jim P.

    Supoorting Oracle, MSSQL7, Sybase 8, & Pervasive. Confusion Reigns

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •