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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Los Angeles
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    14

    Unanswered: How to modify SQL Server 2000 column datatypes?

    Hello,

    I'm new to using SQL Server 2000. I recently created a table with about 12 columns by importing an already existing spreadsheet. When I look at the table in SQL Server Enterprise Manager, the grid of data is rather wide and I have to scroll to the right to see all columns. Even though I drag each of the column boudaries to the left to try to 'shrink' the view sizes, once I exit Enterprise Manager the changes are not applied/saved.

    I would like to see all columns in one screen. Can someone advise if I can do it?

    Also, many of the columns have sizes e.g., 8 or 10, that are larger than I need. Is there a simple way to modify column datatypes in a GUI view? Somehow, Design View does not let me make changes to the datatype sizes.

    Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
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    Provided Answers: 1
    Design view will allow you to make changes providing you have sufficient permission to do so, and that they do not violate data and relationship integrity issues. You cannot make changes from the "Open table" view.

    Enterprise manager is a tool, not an application. Formatting functionality such as setting (and retaining) a column's display width is not included in Enterprise Manager. You need to use a 3rd party reporting tool or build your own application for reporting.

    You can also execute your query through Query Analyzer and specifically cast the resulting columns to your desired widths, and you can view results in either text or spreadsheet (grid) format. Query Analyzer is preferred for view data over Enterprise Manager, because you can inadvertently change data while viewing it in Enterprise Manager.

    blindman
    Last edited by blindman; 10-13-03 at 14:39.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    14
    blindman,

    Thank you for your ideas and suggestions. I will take them into account as I work with my table (and other future tables also).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
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    Provided Answers: 1
    Are you really an Aussie? I lived in Melbourne for two years when I was a kid (1975-76).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    14
    Absolutely!

    As they say --- and perhaps you remember --- fair dinkum Aussie!!! I've been here for many years, so I'm really more American than Aussie. I was never in Melbourne, or even Sydney, for that matter. I spent my early years in Perth before coming over to L.A.

    By the way, can I ask you one more thing about DB's? In Oracle I can sign on and get into 'Command-Level' mode and do all my queries and table changes, etc. there. Is Query Analyzer in SQL Server 2000 the equivalent concept? And is this where all the T-SQL commands and scripts get executed? This may seem self-obvious, but as I mentioned I am just beginning to 'get my feet wet' in SQL Server 2000.

    Thanks again!

    Joe

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
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    Provided Answers: 1
    Query analyzer is a very convenient nuts-and-bolts method of executing any query, select, update, or DDL. There is also a command-line utility called ISQL (used to be called OSQL) for executing querys from a DOS command prompt or batch file.

    Other methods of executing query statements include the SQL Server Job Scheduler, the Enterprise Manager table view window, 3rd-party reporting tools such as Crystal Reports (yech ), and of course application development languages such as VB, C++, ASP, etc which can submit statements to the server for processing and then display the results.

    I never got to Perth. The farthest east I ever got was Alice Springs and Ayer's rock.

    blindman

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    14
    I take it you are a believer in SQL Server and the usage of Query Analyzer to resolve most data-handling needs? You mention the possibility of using other apps like VB and C++ to interface with SQL Server. This intrigues me. Do you think I might be able to use a PC-based version of COBOL (say, Fujitsu COBOL) to 'drive' a batch job and call SQL Server when I need it to pass data to the COBOL program for further processing?

    Actually, Perth is on the west coast and Alice Springs and Ayers Rock are in the center.

    Thanks again,

    Joe

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ohio
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    Provided Answers: 1
    I thought that below the equator everything was reversed? You know, East is West, West is East, so that since everyone is upside-down it all cancels out.

    Use query analyzer. It has much lower overhead and is more direct than trying to do on-the-fly queries by passing statements from COBOL, etc...

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