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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    51

    Red face Unanswered: raw chunks...what, who, where !?!?! HELP!

    Good morning everyone,
    My company recently lost its Informix DBA and I just realized that although I know we have about 15 gigs worth of unallocated chunks that I can assign to the database, I dont really know where they are! We run informix on a RS6000 (aix/unix) using raw disk space.

    Is there a way to list/inventory unallocated chunks? Please help, this is dumb and embarrassing!
    -thanks in advance
    When in doubt just ask your self,
    -WWSBD?-
    (what would Sponge Bob do?)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    20
    Hi,

    Use:

    onstat -d

    this command list all dbspaces and physical location.

    Marcelo E.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    51

    ?

    But will it show 'unallocated' chunks available and waiting to be assigned?

    Originally posted by marceloespinosa
    Hi,

    Use:

    onstat -d

    this command list all dbspaces and physical location.

    Marcelo E.
    When in doubt just ask your self,
    -WWSBD?-
    (what would Sponge Bob do?)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    20
    Informix don't show 'unallocated' chunks available and waiting to be assigned, only show used chunks.

    Chunk are not same that system partition.

    If you wish to know system partitions are free, use RS Administration tool.

    Marcelo E.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    51

    ?

    Can you tell me a little about that tool? I am running on an AIX machine but have not heard of it. The problem I have is I know that we have chunks that our prior sysadmin had ready to allocate, I just have no good way of knowing for sure what they are, what they are even called for that matter.

    Originally posted by marceloespinosa
    Informix don't show 'unallocated' chunks available and waiting to be assigned, only show used chunks.

    Chunk are not same that system partition.

    If you wish to know system partitions are free, use RS Administration tool.

    Marcelo E.
    When in doubt just ask your self,
    -WWSBD?-
    (what would Sponge Bob do?)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    20
    The tool name is System Management Interface Tool (SMIT), this have to version Graphical, Character or Web interface, all are same thing, you must understand: What are physical disk ?, logical disk o volume ?, etc. If you know that, then you can use smit command line or smith graphical interface to query that objects., one of them must be the allocate space for database.

    Go :
    http://publib16.boulder.ibm.com/doc_...seadmntfrm.htm


    that page show the basic management of smit.

    Marcelo E.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    51

    Wink thx

    <slap> <---smacking my forehead. When I saw "RS Administration tool" in your last post, I thought it was some new tool I hadnt heard of. Thanks for the info!

    Originally posted by marceloespinosa
    The tool name is System Management Interface Tool (SMIT), this have to version Graphical, Character or Web interface, all are same thing, you must understand: What are physical disk ?, logical disk o volume ?, etc. If you know that, then you can use smit command line or smith graphical interface to query that objects., one of them must be the allocate space for database.

    Go :
    http://publib16.boulder.ibm.com/doc_...seadmntfrm.htm


    that page show the basic management of smit.

    Marcelo E.
    When in doubt just ask your self,
    -WWSBD?-
    (what would Sponge Bob do?)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    177
    My guess is that on AIX you have already cut your disk space into volume groups on logical volumes. If your are saying the there are chunks "ready to go", I'll assume that that means logical volumes allocated but not in use.


    With Informix running:

    at the AIX command line (or smitty) you can list volume groups with "lsvg".

    With the list, you can then say "lsvg myvgname", where myvgname is one of your volume groups. This will tell you how much space allocated vs. free on that volume group (in partitions).

    if you then keyin "lsvg -l myvgname" (that's a lowercase "L"), you will see the logical volumes that have been created, their size, and if they are in use. With Informix up, all the chucks that Informix knows about would show as "open/syncd".

    Depending upon how the instance was set up, an "onstat -d" will either show the direct reference to the "raw" side of the logical volume (usually under /dev) or it will show a link which points to the "raw".
    Fred Prose

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    51

    thanks a lot

    Originally posted by fprose
    My guess is that on AIX you have already cut your disk space into volume groups on logical volumes. If your are saying the there are chunks "ready to go", I'll assume that that means logical volumes allocated but not in use.

    Thanks Fred,
    Thats exactly the kind of thing I am looking for.
    -d

    With Informix running:

    at the AIX command line (or smitty) you can list volume groups with "lsvg".

    With the list, you can then say "lsvg myvgname", where myvgname is one of your volume groups. This will tell you how much space allocated vs. free on that volume group (in partitions).

    if you then keyin "lsvg -l myvgname" (that's a lowercase "L"), you will see the logical volumes that have been created, their size, and if they are in use. With Informix up, all the chucks that Informix knows about would show as "open/syncd".

    Depending upon how the instance was set up, an "onstat -d" will either show the direct reference to the "raw" side of the logical volume (usually under /dev) or it will show a link which points to the "raw".
    When in doubt just ask your self,
    -WWSBD?-
    (what would Sponge Bob do?)

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