Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    6

    Unanswered: Whats the Difference ? ?? ?? ?

    What the hell is the difference between splitting a database and linking a database. Is linking just creating an image or something. Splitting a database is neccessary for multi user environment right ??

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Roanoke, Va
    Posts
    445

    Smile Re: Whats the Difference ? ?? ?? ?

    Originally posted by Messiah
    What the hell is the difference between splitting a database and linking a database. Is linking just creating an image or something. Splitting a database is neccessary for multi user environment right ??
    I'm not as up to speed as some on the forum but I can tell you what I know. When you split an Access database into its data (tables) and user interface (forms, reports, queries etc) you have to create a link to where the data resides. When you create this link to each of the tables, the tables in the database window will appear with an arrow next to them. From what I know of the process, the linking and splitting are two parts of the same operation. This can be done both through the user interface in the database window and through code.

    The reason I hesitate to say this is all it is, is you may be refering to an Access Data Project (ADP) that uses Access as a front end for SQL Server (and maybe other databases as well. I'm not sure). I have limited experience in this area so I will refrain from further comment on this part of it.

    If this answers your question, great. If not there are others that can.

    Hope this has had some value.

    Gregg

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Earth | North America | United States | California | Long Beach
    Posts
    62
    The Database split wizard under the tools menu is how I have always done my database splits. (Access 2000)

    This process builds the backend database (with _be appended to the end of the file name) and creates links to those tables within your original database.

    The links are definitely imagelike which I learned from experience. When you Copy a link it does not make a copy of the back end table. It merely makes a copy of the link (all within the front end database). I have not figured out how having two links to the same table adds any value or how it could be used.

    With regard to multi user. The company I am at now ran a multiuser database without splitting the database. This makes it extremely difficulty to make changes to any of the front end objects. So, needless to say, I split the database within the first week of being here. This allows me to have a set of "source code" that I can make changes on and then deploy to the users. This alleviates lock problems.

    With that, it is not required to be split in order to have multiple users. But, you probably want it split for many more reasons than I have stated.

    Jack

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    706

    Wink

    Splitting is not "necessary" for multi-user operation but it's pretty-much a necessity with Access and always has been.

    The root problem with MS-Access's design is that everything is put into one file: tables, forms, reports, code-modules... everything. Which means that there are a number of problems:

    -> How can the developer make changes to anything?

    -> If a procedure needs a "temporary table" to hold something, where can it go?

    -> All those constant references to the same shared file for absolutely-everything all-the-time really slows down a network.

    Database-splitting cleanly divides "the data" from "everything else." Most databases are, and should be, started out that way from the get-go. If it wasn't, then "here's mister wizard."

    A slight but sinister "gotcha" is that certain operations do not work the same way for attached tables as they do for native ones. Tables can also become fairly easily "detached." The database-split wizard only goes about two-thirds of the way. But remember that there is a LOT of free code out there (and good, practical books out there) which shows you the rest of the tricks.

    (Hint: spend a lot of time on forums like these.)
    ChimneySweep(R): fast, automatic
    table repair at a click of the
    mouse! http://www.sundialservices.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •