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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    6

    Unanswered: Is Anyone Here Familiar With The Act! Database??

    I know client who is doing a migration project, and she wants to know whether to migrate to MS Access or the Act! Database from Excel. I hadn't even HEARD of Act! before.

    Can anyone out there do a comparison of these two DBs?
    I would be eternally grateful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    nyc
    Posts
    6

    ACT!

    I'm fairly familar with both ACCESS & ACT. Too many variables to go into without a mission statement of sorts. In otherwords:
    what is it for?
    how much time and money is to be spent?
    what knowledge is available to set it up?

    still the stuff is fairly easy. let me know what's up and i'll try to help.

    PS
    ACT is a sub of your uk based Best Software. Their big thing is SalesLogix, Interact is bigger too. Worked with both for multinationals.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    6

    Re: ACT!

    Oh, great! It was kind of you to make a response.

    I am a temp at a company, and they want me to help out with a migration project from Excel to either Access or Act. They don't know which one to use.

    So, I did a brief study of what Act! was about, and I don't see what it offers that MS Access doesn't. It seems to me that a combination of Access, Excel, Word, and Outlook can accomplish all the tasks that Act! can perform.

    So why do people purchase Act! at all, when most people already have the MS Office suite? My first thought was that Act! handles concurrent users better when run on a server. From my understanding, Access can handle up to 25 concurrent users without locking up, as long you split up the database properly between front end and back end.

    Furthermore, I went to Amazon.com to check out the customer reviews for Act! 6.0 -- not good. Here is what one gentleman had to say about the product:

    "Way too cumbersome! Takes too much time to build database information. Since this program is designed for people working quickly with multiple clients (like a salesperson), it should not take too long enter some basic data. Unfortunately, it is a tedious process. The tools that are available once you do are formidable, however. The email is awful. Could not get it too work from my Outlook Express, despite claims by ACT that it supports OE. If you want to use the default email address in Outlook and have more time than me to enter client information (read: lots of time to enter data), then this can be a good program."

    The company has around 25 workstation users, and theoretically they can access the DB at once, though it seems unlikely. As far as what kind of tech support they have, it sounds like it may have to be me. Yikes! Right now we're trying to weigh out the pros and cons of Access vs. Act. Any help that you can give would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks, and I really apologize that this post is absurdly long.


    Originally posted by dabowery
    I'm fairly familar with both ACCESS & ACT. Too many variables to go into without a mission statement of sorts. In otherwords:
    what is it for?
    how much time and money is to be spent?
    what knowledge is available to set it up?

    still the stuff is fairly easy. let me know what's up and i'll try to help.

    PS
    ACT is a sub of your uk based Best Software. Their big thing is SalesLogix, Interact is bigger too. Worked with both for multinationals.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Wilmington Delaware
    Posts
    3
    Well, Access is simply a database engine used to create a finished application, while ACT is a complete application. It is really an apples and oranges discussion here.

    MS Office doesn't magically connect information between its various programs. Someone has to build those links.

    ACT has business rules built in. Access doesn't.

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