Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    The Bottom of The Barrel
    Posts
    6,102
    Provided Answers: 1

    Unanswered: Report navigation bar drawing error

    Hey guys (and gals)

    I'm having an issue with the navigation bar being drawn incorrectly on a few of my reports. If I include a Maximize command in the onload event of the report, it seems like it's drawing two navbars in the bottom left. Also, it seems like it draws a little porton of a scrollbar in the upper right, but it's not functional. I have included a few screen shots to illustrate:

    Multiple toolbars
    Bit of scrollbar?

    To make matters even stranger, if I "restore down" the windows, and then manually maximize the report again by physically clicking on the maximize button, then it is drawn correctly.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Roanoke, Va
    Posts
    445

    Smile Re: Report navigation bar drawing error

    Originally posted by Teddy
    Hey guys (and gals)

    I'm having an issue with the navigation bar being drawn incorrectly on a few of my reports. If I include a Maximize command in the onload event of the report, it seems like it's drawing two navbars in the bottom left. Also, it seems like it draws a little porton of a scrollbar in the upper right, but it's not functional. I have included a few screen shots to illustrate:

    Multiple toolbars
    Bit of scrollbar?

    To make matters even stranger, if I "restore down" the windows, and then manually maximize the report again by physically clicking on the maximize button, then it is drawn correctly.

    Any thoughts?
    Which version of Access are you using Teddy?

    I think I had this problem in Access 97 several years ago but I'm having trouble remembering what I did to correct it. I believe I noticed it in forms but not reports.
    I have in the past invoked the DoEvents function to allow Windows to it's thing when things don't seem to be happening the way I expect.

    Gregg

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    The Bottom of The Barrel
    Posts
    6,102
    Provided Answers: 1
    Which version of Access are you using Teddy?

    I think I had this problem in Access 97 several years ago but I'm having trouble remembering what I did to correct it. I believe I noticed it in forms but not reports.
    I have in the past invoked the DoEvents function to allow Windows to it's thing when things don't seem to be happening the way I expect.

    Gregg
    I am using Access 2002 as a front end to SQL Server 2k. I'm not familiar with the DoEvents function, I'll have to do some research. I did also try to use a Repaint statement (DoCmd.Repaint whereas reports don't natively have a repaint method) but that didn't seem to help much.

    This is one of those rare problems where I don't even know where to begin debugging. There doesn't seem to be an obvious way to diagnose the problem.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Roanoke, Va
    Posts
    445

    Smile

    Originally posted by Teddy
    I am using Access 2002 as a front end to SQL Server 2k. I'm not familiar with the DoEvents function, I'll have to do some research. I did also try to use a Repaint statement (DoCmd.Repaint whereas reports don't natively have a repaint method) but that didn't seem to help much.

    This is one of those rare problems where I don't even know where to begin debugging. There doesn't seem to be an obvious way to diagnose the problem.
    I'm sure you can look it up yourself but since I'm here......

    DoEvents Function


    Yields execution so that the operating system can process other events.

    Syntax

    DoEvents( )

    Remarks

    The DoEvents function returns an Integer representing the number of open forms in stand-alone versions of Visual Basic, such as Visual Basic, Professional Edition. DoEvents returns zero in all other applications.

    DoEvents passes control to the operating system. Control is returned after the operating system has finished processing the events in its queue and all keys in the SendKeys queue have been sent.

    DoEvents is most useful for simple things like allowing a user to cancel a process after it has started, for example a search for a file. For long-running processes, yielding the processor is better accomplished by using a Timer or delegating the task to an ActiveX EXE component.. In the latter case, the task can continue completely independent of your application, and the operating system takes case of multitasking and time slicing.

    Caution Any time you temporarily yield the processor within an event procedure, make sure the procedure is not executed again from a different part of your code before the first call returns; this could cause unpredictable results. In addition, do not use DoEvents if other applications could possibly interact with your procedure in unforeseen ways during the time you have yielded control.


    Hey it's only pseudo-paper so why not.

    Good Luck.

    Gregg

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •