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  1. #1
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    Unanswered: .Ldf and transactions

    Can I create a database without an .ldf file
    even if I use updates in transactions

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Re: .Ldf and transactions

    As far as I know, you cannot. DB has to have a transaction file. You can keep the size to a minimum if you set the recovery mode of the db to simple (if you don't care for recovery of the data).
    Originally posted by Karolyn
    Can I create a database without an .ldf file
    even if I use updates in transactions

  3. #3
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    Re: .Ldf and transactions

    that's what I tought,
    thks

  4. #4
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    The Holy book says :
    Microsoft® SQL Server™ 2000 maps a database using a set of operating-system files. All data and objects in the database, such as tables, stored procedures, triggers, and views, are stored within these operating-system files:

    Primary
    This file contains the startup information for the database and is used to store data. Every database has one primary data file.

    Secondary
    These files hold all of the data that does not fit in the primary data file. If the primary file can hold all of the data in the database, databases do not need to have secondary data files. Some databases may be large enough to need multiple secondary data files or to use secondary files on separate disk drives to spread data across multiple disks.

    Transaction Log
    These files hold the log information used to recover the database. There must be at least one log file for each database.
    Get yourself a copy of the The Holy Book

    order has no physical Brett in The meaning of a Kaiser . -database data

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    2,232
    There are certain transactions that ss2k has to manage like ddl commands and checkpoints. So you will always have a log file.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    If you are curious about what is kept in the log file you can use the dbcc log command.

  7. #7
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    I've read in the Online Help
    that exists a Virtual Transaction Log in SQL Server

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    England
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    the transaction log file is made up of many virtual logs - SQL uses these to manage the usage, reusage, growth and shrinking of the transaction log file.
    Regards
    Dbabren

  9. #9
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    thx all

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    9

    Red face

    Originally posted by rnealejr
    If you are curious about what is kept in the log file you can use the dbcc log command.
    HI,

    I AM REWIEVING THE FORUM SEEKING A HINT FOR OUR PROBLEM. OUR LOG FILE HAS DRAMATICLY INCREASED WITHIN FEW HOURS... IT HAS HAPPEND TWICE SO FAR.

    I AM CURIOUS HOW CAN I REVIEW THE LOG FILE CONTENTS SO THAT TO LOCALISE THE SOURCE OF THAT SUDDEN GROWTH.

    IS IT A GOOD WAY TO TRY DBCC? I TRIED TO FIND A PROPER COMMAND ON THE LIST IN BOOKS ONLINE, BUT I AM NOT SURE WHICH ONE I SHOULD USE.

    THANKS IN ADVANCE FOR ANY HELP
    JACK

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    There is no command that I'm aware of that will tell you the SQL of the transactions held in the trans log. There are a few 3rd party tools about that claim to do it - although I have never used them.

    There is a dbcc loginfo command which will tell which parts of the log file are active and which are not, although no more detail than that I'm afraid.

    Hope this helps
    Regards
    Dbabren

  12. #12
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    You can use

    dbcc log ('dbname',type) where type is a number between 0-4 to get a general idea. However this will not show you the actual queries that were executed.
    Get yourself a copy of the The Holy Book

    order has no physical Brett in The meaning of a Kaiser . -database data

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    9
    THANKS!

    Originally posted by dbabren
    There is no command that I'm aware of that will tell you the SQL of the transactions held in the trans log. There are a few 3rd party tools about that claim to do it - although I have never used them.

    There is a dbcc loginfo command which will tell which parts of the log file are active and which are not, although no more detail than that I'm afraid.

    Hope this helps

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    9
    Thanks!

    Do You know maybe where I can read more about the logic of each column extracted?

    Thanks for futher hints in advance.

    Jack

    Originally posted by Enigma
    You can use

    dbcc log ('dbname',type) where type is a number between 0-4 to get a general idea. However this will not show you the actual queries that were executed.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    9
    Do You remember maybe any of those companies www pages?

    Thanks a lot in advance.
    Jack


    Originally posted by dbabren
    There is no command that I'm aware of that will tell you the SQL of the transactions held in the trans log. There are a few 3rd party tools about that claim to do it - although I have never used them.

    There is a dbcc loginfo command which will tell which parts of the log file are active and which are not, although no more detail than that I'm afraid.

    Hope this helps

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