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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    4

    Unanswered: Excel VBA programmer

    Programmer needed visual basic, in excel

    I own a bee removal company . I keep most my records and calcualtions in excel and I am looking for an excel specialist / vba programmer that can write code to simplify and speed up some of the time consuming
    tasks. Time is a factor for me, money is less of a factor. I imagine it would be around 80 hrs work. With probable future changes and or additions that would most likley arise.

    Example:

    Bee removal work can be divided into two parts,
    1 exterminating a hive, and
    2. removing the honey from the structure (from 5 to 300 lbs).

    The field rep exterminates the hive and sets the appointment for the removal.
    The technicians remove the honey from the structure and perform repairs.

    I am looking for someone in Southern California. If interested please contact me at:
    > >adkins@san.rr.com
    > >john adkins

    Problem

    Right now I pay a sales rep 20% of the exterm fee and nothing for signing up
    the removal.

    I've created a macro that calculates each field reps exterminations for the
    week, removals, averages per job etc, and calculates the money the field rep
    earned. Its a little crude but it works.

    Im trying to encourage the reps to focus on closing more removals, this way
    I make much more money. As an incentive, I plan on breaking up the 20% (for
    the kill) to a percentage for exterminating (the kill), and a percentage for
    setting up a removal.

    I don't have the time to design this, neither would I do a good job at it.
    Basically the macro would do something like this:

    for employee field search for
    "NW" then find desired dates within date serviced field, then take a % from
    exterm fee, add it to desired % for removal (if any) matching the desired
    pay period or dates. to come up with the amount to pay NW for the 2 weeks.
    as well as more accurately gather data for that period totaling # of exterms,
    repairs, ave per job, etc. so for every job Nick W 'NW' did during a inputted period of time,
    I would have a detailed analysis as well as the amount to pay Nick.

    A field rep is in either a level 1, 2, or 3, depending on past performance. A level 1's % of pay is less than that of a level 3.
    This is the first time I've written this information up so you may have trouble following it as I've explained it.

    But this is one example of data that I'm looking for at the click of a button.
    There are 5 to 10 other similar equations or macros which I would need to have written up.
    Also with hopes that the code would be able to sit well in upcoming versions of excel.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,091
    I would imagine some of these people would be interested. World class VBA experts.

    http://www.ozgrid.com/

    http://216.92.17.166/

    http://www.tushar-mehta.com/

    http://www.xldennis.com/

    These should point you in the right direction. I have found all of them to be thorough, professional, and courteous.
    old, slow, and confused
    but at least I'm inconsistent!

    Rich
    (retired Excel 2003 user, 3/28/2008)

    How to ask a question on forums

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    4
    Thank you so much for your help.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    109

    uh

    uh what you really need is someone that can take all this BS in excel and translate it into something in Access that will continue to work past 65,000 records.

    the people that made excel so complicated should be shot.
    Access 2002 ADP Rocks my World

    Long live SQL Server and 64bit Windows!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,091
    I will agree that there is definitely a need and place for MS Access; and I use Access for those times.

    However, having worked professionally with Excel for the past 4 years (as an analyst), I am still learning of the power, efficiency, and effectiveness of the program. Are there limitations? Yep. Are there inconsistencies? Yep. Are there frustrations? Yep. BTW, the same answers come with MS Access.

    But because Excel is readily available for distribution (every package of Office has Excel, not every package has Access), and offers growth potential that most people never realize, it many times is the ideal candidate for the customer. And while there are limits on the number of rows in one worksheet, the number of worksheets in a workbook is limited only by the memory of the computer using it.
    old, slow, and confused
    but at least I'm inconsistent!

    Rich
    (retired Excel 2003 user, 3/28/2008)

    How to ask a question on forums

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    109

    xls vs mdb vs adp vs owc

    its just a question of whether you want to do it nice or twice.

    you can easily-- very easily-- develop a system in access that will allow some lil receptionist to print sales reports.

    or you can keep a beancounter on staff in order to troubleshoot problems with excel spreadsheets.

    i prefer the first method-- ms access.

    if you want a good solution, you can pay someone $5000 right off the bat, and have a very compex access database (if you need adp, i start at 15k/project). or you can live in EXCEL.HELL and wade through spreadsheets all day without being able to produce the #s you need. without ever getting faster. without ever being able to stay organized.

    wouldnt you rather keep your data in one file and render it multiple ways?

    access adp reports are the best product out there. they slaughter crystal reports, performance-wise.

    and sql server 2000 has exceeded all analysts expectations... msft is making real gains in the market-share war.. where is oracle gonna fit into this equation 5 years from now?

    maybe they will drop their bs platform and start writing tools for a real RDBMS-- ms sql server

    i make my living in sql server-- but my passion is ms access. the application, not jet.

    it is how i got into databases.

    the real power of ms access is when you scale it to sql server and use a real db backend

    access/jet rocked for many many years. it sure kicks excel around the block--

    but having a simple solution, a front end/thin client that can connect to sql server, and you can use an easy reporting platform? against sql server? without writing a line of code? get real-- ACCESS BEATS EXCEL EVERY DAY

    (unless you have a ton of data and need to use excel/owc against olap cubes-- then excel has the upper hand.. unless of course you are burly enough to flatten those back into sql-side queries-- and can use adp to report against cubes)

    i just cant wait for ms to sell a 64-bit version of their spreadsheet tool. wouldnt that rock to have something the went past 64,000 rows?

    and just for the record, i am trying to get them to sell a copy of office at msft that doesnt contain excel-- i work there.. but im a lowly dw/olap guy-- what would i really know about ms office?
    Access 2002 ADP Rocks my World

    Long live SQL Server and 64bit Windows!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Östersund Sweden
    Posts
    60
    Gentlemen,

    Shade - Thanks for pointing me here to this forum - its look great for db

    From a strictly professional point of view:

    The OP have not provided enough information for making any decision about an usuable and a final solution.

    Different problems/issues require different solutions.

    In some cases a solution based only on a RDBMS is the best choice, sometimes a spreadsheet-solution is the best and sometimes a combination of RDBMS & spreadsheet is the one to go for.

    Sometimes we even end up with a solution that is based on total different tools then discussed here!

    I find it amusing that MS Access and MS Excel are compared with each other and that members argue about which is best.

    After all, per se MS Access is a database-software and MS Excel is a spreadsheet-software.

    Season greetings from,
    Dennis

    (I´m also running MS SQL 2000 / Access 2002&2003/MySQL 4.0 / DB2 / SAP DB 7.4 )
    Kind regards,
    Dennis

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    109

    how

    im just curious-- why do you think that excel is ever better than access?

    is it faster, more expandable, more flexible?

    i tell you the answer is no, no and no.

    is it easier? maybe for some beancounter-- but thats just cuz they havent woken up to this phenomenon called the 90's. :)

    i dont really know of any situation where excel is the best long-term solution. it works -- allright -- for pivot tables driven from OLAP.

    but i see that as an activeX control and not a real part of excel.

    and anyone that isnt looking longterm deserves to be ROI'ed out of a job.

    ms access rox. it is better, faster, easier than vb or java, or any of that other crap.

    it is a better reporting environment that crystal reports-- and it wont cost $75,000 to make it web-based (sql server reporting services)

    sql server is the most powerful-- db2 is too expensive and slow in my opinion (even if the only reason is that it is slower is that it is too expensive to upgrade and thus we can fairly compare old db2 to new sql server (although IBM has made SOME progress in waking up to reality in these past few years).

    but the point still remains that access can use sql server.

    access can use mysql.

    and excel sux.

    i attached a copy of a DOC (although it is not my favorite office program either-- i will permit it's use once or twice a month)

    it is from luke chung of fms.

    as in the head honcho.

    plz read it :)
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Access 2002 ADP Rocks my World

    Long live SQL Server and 64bit Windows!!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Östersund Sweden
    Posts
    60
    Hi Aaron,

    Your message remind me about the group of "Linux-warriors" that tend to pop-up on Windows-forum from time to time who just scream out their message that Linux is best no matter what.

    I can´t see any reason to continue to discuss the subject with You.

    Kind regards,
    Dennis
    Kind regards,
    Dennis

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,091
    Yes, Dennis, I came to the same conclusion about this "discussion" yesterday. Thanks for dropping by.
    old, slow, and confused
    but at least I'm inconsistent!

    Rich
    (retired Excel 2003 user, 3/28/2008)

    How to ask a question on forums

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    109

    did you read the .DOC? plz?

    did you read the .DOC? plz?
    Access 2002 ADP Rocks my World

    Long live SQL Server and 64bit Windows!!!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,091
    Yes, I have read it. But I wonder where it supports your view. Here are a few quotes:

    The database needs of an organization are unpredictable and change over time. Microsoft Access solves many database problems but not all and neither do other tools.
    Notice that this opening thought directs the entire paper: "The database needs". The OP does not indicate whether he has database needs that require Access. Given his brief discussion of issues it might just as easily work in Excel.

    page 7
    Although Excel is not a relational database, it solves many simple database problems completely. That’s because many database problems can be solved with simple database solutions. Only a tiny percentage of Excel spreadsheets ever reach the limits of Excel, but when they do, many should migrate to Access.
    Note carefully that "simple" does not equate to "bean counter" mentality. I know brilliant people who find all their needs met with Excel, and many of them work in Fortune 500 companies.


    page 12
    Access is the best solution for the segment between Excel spreadsheet and more sophisticated database solutions.
    And that is a true statement, but still does not validate your derogation of Excel. It does not say that Access is "better" than Excel, rather that in the scope of database work, it fits between Excel and more sophisticated database solutions.
    old, slow, and confused
    but at least I'm inconsistent!

    Rich
    (retired Excel 2003 user, 3/28/2008)

    How to ask a question on forums

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    172
    Aaron_kempf,

    You are forgetting a key part of this whole thread. The poster likes Excel, feels comfortable with Excel and already is using it to support his business.

    Excel may very well be the most widely used database, yes, database, in the world. It ships with nearly every copy of Office so it's on most desktops.

    Many people do not even know about the existence of Access and never miss it.

    BTW 90% of my database work is in Access but I also love Excel. I think Excel rocks.

    Finally, being so polarized here that one product is great and another is not does not help your case because the fact is that Access and Excel can exist together and were designed to work hand-in-hand using automation.

    I've written dozens of Excel-Access projects where Access owns the tables and Excel does the number-crunching. It does not have to be a one or the other proposition.

    Joe G
    Last edited by JoeG; 12-30-03 at 17:42.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    109

    fact remains

    the fact remains that you can either:

    a) hire a access developer to make a nice lil app for $5-$20k and then pay someone $12/hour to type stuff into a database (and of course print out reports)

    b) hire a beancounter fulltime at $40k and pay that much money forever.

    what is the best long term solution?

    excel cannot be automated into something that is simple, fast, flexible and scalable.

    excel can never be used for multiple users at once-- all of those features and functionality are a total joke (compared to the beauty of a .ldb file)

    i think that excel is a great product.

    but i would NEVER let it in my company. it is just too difficult to automate correctly and turn into a bulletproof, flexible solution.

    excel needs to come out with reports-- just like in Access-- that export to .SNP files.

    then i would take it seriously.
    Access 2002 ADP Rocks my World

    Long live SQL Server and 64bit Windows!!!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    1,091

    Re: fact remains

    Originally posted by aaron_kempf

    b) hire a beancounter fulltime at $40k and pay that much money forever.
    Mileage may vary....

    excel cannot be automated into something that is simple, fast, flexible and scalable.

    excel can never be used for multiple users at once-- all of those features and functionality are a total joke (compared to the beauty of a .ldb file)

    i think that excel is a great product.

    but i would NEVER let it in my company. it is just too difficult to automate correctly and turn into a bulletproof, flexible solution.
    That depends on the needs. For one project, I use Access as my database, but what I deliver to ~80 markets throughout the US is a set of Excel spreadsheets (one for each market, plus all supervisors) that I have totally automated; what used to take one "bean counter" four weeks now is completed in just under two hours. I don't "touch" the data. It is automated into Access, and all markets spreadsheets are automated with charts, including automatically removing all zero-components from the charts - and I never touch the charts. And all tables and charts are automated by linking to buttons to include quarterly views, and YTD, and various mixes. Plus I provide regional and national summaries that are all automated in Excel. And they can't all work on them at the same time because none of them have need to know for any other region/market.

    Guess what? In 3+ years, not one person in the entire cycle has ever broken the Excel product - and none of them are computer geeks or have any idea how any of it works, some can open files, cut/paste, and do simple things and not much more. The design of the spreadsheets, summaries, etc. meets exactly the needs of people all the way to the CEO. The development of these took time (testing, re-testing, etc. just like any other "application"). Access works great from my handling of the database. But there is no way that it would be usable in this diverse arena as a distributed product.


    excel needs to come out with reports-- just like in Access-- that export to .SNP files.

    then i would take it seriously.
    Would I like to see enhancements in Excel? Yes, indeed! I could list many here, including possible report features. But Excel has proven to be a valuable asset - in a company with 70,000 employees, that has everything from mainframes and many types of databases and software. But there is a substantial role for Excel for more than the "bean counters".



    .... from one is who isn't quite a bean counter, although I am old enough to remember those days (Math major/physics minor in college before personal computers ["newest" was an IBM 360 using Fortran IV], and I never learned how to use a slide rule, until I began to teach high school after graduating from college).
    Last edited by shades; 01-16-04 at 18:21.
    old, slow, and confused
    but at least I'm inconsistent!

    Rich
    (retired Excel 2003 user, 3/28/2008)

    How to ask a question on forums

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