Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    176

    Unanswered: SQL Server licensing

    Hi,

    My company is embarking on a data warehousing project. We are going to purchase a Windows 2003 server. It would be a dual processor. The specs are not certain yet so cannot give more details on that.

    1. The data in the warehouse would be close to 150 GB.
    2. There will be maximum of 10 users needs a SQL Server license.
    3. Do not need analysis services.

    What edition do I go with -Enterprise OR Standara? I want the least priced edition. I looked up the various links on Books Online but I am still not able to decide.

    Say I need only 2 GB of RAM. Then here are my questions.

    1. Since we are going with a dual-processor, do I need to purchase processor license for each of the two? Why can't I have one license on one processor only? What are the implications of this?

    2. The 10 users that I am talking about will be remotely connecting to this Windows 2003 server and accessing the databae.

    3. What exactly is Failover clustering? Do I really need it for my warehousing project?

    4. Please help me pick the correct license. Here is the link -

    http://www.microsoft.com/sql/howtobuy/default.asp

    Thanks,

    Vivek

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Jersey
    Posts
    10,322
    Well if you want warehousing you must be ENTERPRISE

    Unless you build your own data warehousing infrastructure....

    I'm SURE I'm oversimplifing, but warehousing is an elegant form of denormalization...

    There are some aritechure components (I think) that allow you to do things with SQL, but other than that...

    Any commments?

    Has my trolley derailed?
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
    dbForums Member List
    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    176

    Reponse to Brett

    Brett,

    We are going to use Business Intelligence tools from a vendor for the project. Now do I need an Enterprise? I mean all I am going to do is import 150 GB of data to SQL Server using DTS,stored procs etc. Back up the data at regular intervals. Make sure that the data stays current. All that is from a warehouse point of view. Once the data is in place I am going to use the vendors tools for analysis.

    I am not well versed with log shipping and failover clustering and online backup(a feature of enterprise I believe). Now do you think I would need them for my warehouse.

    -Vivek


    Originally posted by Brett Kaiser
    Well if you want warehousing you must be ENTERPRISE

    Unless you build your own data warehousing infrastructure....

    I'm SURE I'm oversimplifing, but warehousing is an elegant form of denormalization...

    There are some aritechure components (I think) that allow you to do things with SQL, but other than that...

    Any commments?

    Has my trolley derailed?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Jersey
    Posts
    10,322
    With out knowing your architceture, it's hard to say...

    but...

    if all you want to do is...

    Move data around
    Build denormalized objects
    Enable a warm standby
    Not require 24x7 uptime
    The vendor does not require it

    Then I don't think you need ENTERPRISE

    Replication...can be acheived by shipping trans logs to a back and have them applied..
    Clustering....allows for 24x7 availablitiy
    Online Backups...Available in standard...

    You'll have to build these things that "come" with sql server enterprise...

    but I don't think it's a big deal...

    It's not OLTP right?

    EDIT: Plus all I ever hear is people complaining about the configurations, the need to disable replication if objections change...yada yada yada...although it'll look good on the resume' no doubt....
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
    dbForums Member List
    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    176
    Yes it's not OLTP? The data from OLTP is got into SQL Server 2000 and is denormalized for OLAP.

    Can you elaborate on why standard doesn't provide 24x7 uptime? What do you mean by that?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Jersey
    Posts
    10,322
    It takes time to restore and/or bring a warm back up online to replace production....

    Replication and Clustering, allow you 24x7 (or damn close) uptime

    Replication writes data to another box to protect from data lose

    Clustering protects from service loss (not load balancing as is the myth)

    Why can't OLAP incurr 10 minutes to 1/2 downtime?

    especially for the money

    PLUS...with Warehousing, I would imagine objects are created and change quite regularly...I would think replication would be a sever handicap..everytime an object changes you have to stop replication, apply the changes in both locations, and restart replication (I think (although there has been some speculation about that))

    Good Luck

    Where's development going on?
    Brett
    8-)

    It's a Great Day for America everybody!

    dbforums Yak CorralRadio 'Rita
    dbForums Member List
    I'm Good Once as I ever was

    The physical order of data in a database has no meaning.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    2,232
    The processor concern - well, I would consult microsoft on this, just to cover yourself. But I went through a similar scenario and we purchased for both cpus - however, within sql server you can select the processor affinity so you might be able to cover yourself. However, with any data warehouse, the cpu resource is one of the biggest used so 2 will be beneficial, even on a small data warehouse.

    Also, does your company have a license agreement with ms. Depending on the size of your company, there may be no price difference between enterprise and standard. However, check the requirements of your client piece (Business Intelligence) - it might require enterprise. There are several differences between the versions for analytical services. Check out this link:

    link

    24x7 - Brett was referencing the failover clustering capability of enterprise edition.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    176
    Back to my licensing question - Check this definition from MS Licensing FAQ

    'Multiplexing.' Hardware or software that reduces the number of Devices directly accessing or using the Server Software does not reduce the number of required CALs. The number you need is based on the number of distinct inputs to the hardware or software 'front end.'"

    This means that if I have an application (Business Intelligence tool) in my case, that accesses the database then if 25 devices/users use the application, I would need 25 CAL's. But how does the SQL Server know how many users are indirectly accessing it via the application?
    Last edited by vivek_vdc; 01-08-04 at 15:09.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    2,232
    Did you see the remainder of that paragraph:

    In most cases Microsoft requires a CAL for every device that accesses or uses the services of SQL Server 2000. If you are unsure whether a CAL is required, you should contact your Microsoft sales representative or account manager. Inquires can be directed to Microsoft Licensing by calling (800)426-9400.
    Call them.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    2,232
    Also, as far as the multiple processor concern:

    You only have to acquire licenses for processors that are accessible to any copy of the operating system upon which SQL Server 2000 is installed.
    Sneaky bas%rds. It is not based on the application cpu usage, but the os !

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Columbia, MD USA
    Posts
    95
    Originally posted by vivek_vdc
    Back to my licensing question - Check this definition from MS Licensing FAQ

    'Multiplexing.' Hardware or software that reduces the number of Devices directly accessing or using the Server Software does not reduce the number of required CALs. The number you need is based on the number of distinct inputs to the hardware or software 'front end.'"

    This means that if I have an application (Business Intelligence tool) in my case, that accesses the database then if 25 devices/users use the application, I would need 25 CAL's. But how does the SQL Server know how many users are indirectly accessing it via the application?
    funny thing is that it doesn't know how many... the same way that it doesn't know what type of license you purchased or how many... but if you were audited for some reason, you'd be screwed

    back to the original questions...

    Advanced features aside, I'd probably put that database on a machine that could scale up in memory if need be, so you'd probably want to be running Windows Server 2003 Enterprise for the OS and MSSQL 2000 Enterprise as well so you could throw as much of that database into memory as possible. plus if you wanted to use the advanced features, you'd already be there.

    As far as per seat or per processor goes, it depends on what you see in the future in regards to users... if you are NEVER going to have more than those 10 users (not concurrent users btw), then the per seat model is much cheaper and it doesn't matter how many processors you have.

    If you think that you may need quite a few more users in the future, then the per cpu model makes sense as there's no point cheaping out now seeing that they won't give you credit for the per user/seat CALs when it becomes more financially feasable to go with the per cpu licenses

    The reason you have to purchase 2 cpu licenses for a 2 cpu machine is purely legal BS... it says so in the license agreement (the one that everyone reads all the way through... heh heh)

    No wonder MS has $40B+ cash...

    As far as the clustering goes... your desired availability and budget are the only thing determining that... keep in mind that to do it correctly you need to get the right hardware, take your time, and do it correctly (shared storage, testing, etc)... you'll be wasting your time and money otherwise and having more headaches than anyone needs
    drew
    ------------------
    http://wjtechnologies.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    PAKISTAN
    Posts
    106

    Standard VS Enterprise

    I've heard of some of the features that Standard-Edition Lacks.
    Enahanced Read-Ahead and Scan.
    Paralled DBCC; Parallel Index.
    Indexed Views.

    Is it good to choose Standard-Edition despite these features??

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    706
    I'd challenge you to critically consider... if this is a data warehousing application, why do you want the "least cost" solution?

    What you really want is the right solution for this particular task, regardless of what turns out to be right. And, dammit, .. you pays your bills accordingly, and dat's dat. It's a cost-of-goods-sold.

    'Cost' is not a bona fide decision parameter. While nobody wants to throw money away (obviously...), if you buy the wrong license-type and wind up spending even a few hours of personnel time each day or each week, "cobbling your way around it," you haven't saved any money whatsoever.

    "Penny wise but pound foolish." Happens all the time.
    ChimneySweep(R): fast, automatic
    table repair at a click of the
    mouse! http://www.sundialservices.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •