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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    37

    Red face Unanswered: Clueless client who wants to create a table using reserved words

    Hello all,
    I have a database that supports two different applications.
    For arguments sake I'll call them "intelligent app" and "clueless app"

    The client that provided me the schema for the clueless app used reserved words as field names.
    The words used are:
    value, state, and time

    I explained to the client that modifying them could prevent current/future issues.

    The client is an "oracle" db (and in my mind should know better but .....) and responded back to me with the following:

    BEGIN QUOTE
    They are not currently reserved and there is no guarantee they will ever be reserved. In fact, the SQL server line eliminates as many words from the reserved list as they add with new releases. There are other words on the
    possible future reserved keyword list that I do not wish to avoid either unless forced to some day, like depth, size, class, zone, level and others.
    END QUOTE

    Now for the assistance request, where can I find the documented ramifications of using reserved words?
    I want to have my documentation (and my ducks lined up) when this clients portion of the app fails.

    Any and all assistance is greatly appreciated.

    T. Mullins

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Provided Answers: 54
    'splain dat one again... Whyfor you have to be prepared when their Data Modeler's choices hit the fan?

    SQL Server will gleefully tolerate them, as long as they are properly quoted using [], so what the heck do you care? The developers may revolt when their tools act up, but those column names aren't your choices, so they aren't your problems as far as I can see.

    -PatP

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Massachusetts
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    Provided Answers: 11
    Do a search for "Reserved Keywords" in Books OnLine, and you should be presented with the current list of reserved words. One caution, I did come up with tw lists, one for C++ and one for T-SQL.

    A quote from this article reads:
    Although it is syntactically possible to use SQL Server reserved keywords as identifiers and object names in Transact-SQL scripts, this can be done only using delimited identifiers.

    This is pretty much what Pat has said in his post, though.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    37
    Gracias guys !
    I knew of the BOL & MSDN info. I was hoping to have examples of apps that have crashed and burned due to poor design.
    I think I'll wait in the tall grass ........
    Regards to all.
    tam


    Originally posted by MCrowley
    Do a search for "Reserved Keywords" in Books OnLine, and you should be presented with the current list of reserved words. One caution, I did come up with tw lists, one for C++ and one for T-SQL.

    A quote from this article reads:
    Although it is syntactically possible to use SQL Server reserved keywords as identifiers and object names in Transact-SQL scripts, this can be done only using delimited identifiers.

    This is pretty much what Pat has said in his post, though.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Provided Answers: 54
    Oh, there are fabulous stories that go from the 1970s into the 1990s, but they peter out pretty quickly there. By that point in time, nearly everybody in the compiler/database/toolset community had abandoned the L-R grammer parsers for yacc or its equivalent, which allowed them to quickly and easily make it possible to make a product's entire grammer "quote sensistive". That change allowed the product vendors to make it possible for the user to "un-reserve" words that were otherwise reserved by quoting them somehow.

    That change, combined with wider use of code-generators (sometimes by different names, but code generators nonetheless) made it relatively easy to "dodge the bullet" of reserved words.

    It can still be a pain in the posterior, but it is no longer a case of Mohammed and the Mountian. Now the developer can work around the reserved-word problem if they choose to do so.

    -PatP

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