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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2

    Unanswered: Eprints and Perl

    Well, I don't know how to say that :

    I'm in a work placement in order to validate my DUT in computing (Bac +2 - Yes, I'm french).
    I have to install and use a software named Eprints (The primary purpose of the EPrints software is to help create open access to the peer-reviewed research output of all scholarly and scientific research institutions (mainly universities)).
    The installation was hard but I did it. Now, in following the Eprints' documentation, I've to do these commands :

    % bin/generate_apacheconf ARCHIVEID
    % bin/create_tables ARCHIVEID
    % bin/import_subjects ARCHIVEID
    % bin/generate_static ARCHIVEID
    % bin/create_user ARCHIVEID USERID EMAIL admin PASSWORD
    % bin/generate_views ARCHIVEID


    The fourth one make me that :
    #bin/generate_static toto // Yes, my archive's named toto
    Starting language en...
    Insecure dependency in chdir while running with -T switch at /usr/lib/perl5/5.8.3/File/Find.pm line 732.


    Indeed, there is a chdir line 732, but I think that the problem comes from the -T option. Where can I find it ?
    Did anybody have the same problem ?

    Thanks

    PS : Sorry for my awfull english !!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    16
    -T enables "taint checking" which helps secure scripts.

    You can read about it at:
    http://www.perldoc.com/perl5.8.0/pod/perlsec.html
    perl -le 'print reverse reverse "just another perl hacker"'
    wush.net subversion hosting - remote hosted revision control with easy admin, ssl security & backups

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2
    Yes I was knowing that, but do you know where can I find this -T (in my files) to disable it... ;(

    Thank you...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    16
    It's usually a good idea to keep taint checking enabled and to fix the portions of the script that violate it.

    That said, you can usually find it in the first line of your scripts with the path to perl. It will look something like

    #!/usr/bin/perl -T

    You can use grep to find all the files that are using it.
    perl -le 'print reverse reverse "just another perl hacker"'
    wush.net subversion hosting - remote hosted revision control with easy admin, ssl security & backups

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